Página 1 de 2 12 ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 1 al 10 de 12

Hilo: Mi particular EVA 3 - Relojes de Cuarzo

  1. #1
    Avatar de marctibu
    marctibu está en línea Habitual

    User Info Menu

    Mi particular EVA 3

    Buenas tardes compañeros y compañeras, esta tarde tengo el gusto de presentaros una pieza muy emblemática que también lo es para mi. Para los que me conocéis ya sabéis el porqué para los que no os diré que la carrera espacial siempre me fascinó, lo relojes también asi que juntos los dos, imaginaos.




    No, no soy Dave Scott aunque ahora llevo orgulloso un pedacito de historia en mi muñeca, ya sea en forma de rèplica del que fué el Segundo reloj en estar sobre la superficie de nuestro satélite después de los Omega Speedmaster aquel 2 de Agosto de 1971 durante su tercer EVA (Extra Vehicular Activity) del Apollo 15 a manos de D. Scott




    Todo ello queda minuciosamente detallado en las siguientes lineas. además esta vez ha habido suerte y la mayor parte del trabajo ya estaba hecho y es que este tema ya lo había desarrollado con anterioridad en el hilo




    NASA approved: verdades, mentiras y otros relojes espaciales parte 1


    NASA approved: verdades, mentiras y otros relojes espaciales. parte 2


    NASA approved: verdades, mentiras y otros relojes espaciales. parte 3




    No os aburriré con detalles técnicos sobre el reloj sobradamente conocidos por casi todos vosotros y me centraré en la increíble historia con hechos, demostraciones y entrevistas de fuentes de sobrada reputación.




    Iré poniendo fotos de mi unidad a lo largo del hilo para que no se amontonen todas al final del hilo




    IMG_20181127_103714-01 by Marcos, en Flickr




    2019-01-07_05-41-01-01 by Marcos, en Flickr




    Aqui podemos ver el despegue del Apollo 15 en dos imágenes espectaculares




    ap15-KSC-71PC-686HR3 by Marcos, en Flickr








    ap15-71-HC-1103HR2 by Marcos, en Flickr




    Una imagen del módulo de comando y servicio del Apollo 15 en órbita alrrededor de la Luna




    (2 Aug. 1971) --- A view of the Apollo 15 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit as photographed from the Lunar Module (LM) just after rendezvous by Marcos, en Flickr




    Loa aficionados a la Relojería y en especial los amantes y fans de Omega conocen bien la historia que a continuación os describo y que ocurrió durante el tercer EVA del astronauta David Scott de la misión Apollo 15.




    De la web de Fratellowatches, sin duda una web seria y con unos artículos espectaculares




    https://www.fratellowatches.com/frat...ut-dave-scott/




    Os pongo el artículo entero de la entrevista que le hicieron a Dave Scott acerca del famoso Bulova del Apollo 15. recomiendo que lo leais con atención, es muy interesante.




    Primero el original en Inglés y seguidamente su traducción.




    NASA astronaut Dave Scott (1932) was the 7th person to walk on the Moon during the Apollo 15 mission in 1971. Before the Apollo 15 mission, Scott was also pilot of the Gemini 8 mission and Command Module Pilot aboard the Apollo 9. On the Apollo 15 mission, he became the first to drive on the Moon in the Lunar Rover.




    Just like every other Apollo astronaut, Dave Scott was given an Omega Speedmaster Professional with a caliber 321 movement as Omega delivered reference 105.012 and 145.012 watches to NASA shortly after Omega was officially announced as supplier of the timepieces used for Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) by astronauts.




    The published transcript of the second EVA of the Apollo 15 mission (See below for an excerpt) shows interesting information for watch fans. It seems that after the EVA-2, Dave Scott noticed that the Hesalite crystal of his Omega
    Speedmaster Professional popped off when he returned to the cabin. During the EVA-3 here therefore used his back-up watch. For a long time, people (including Dave Scott) were under the assumption that this back-up watch concerned a Waltham timepiece. However, in 2014 he found out that it wasn’t a Waltham but a Bulova. A Bulova Chronograph model 88510/01. That is the watch we are about to discuss with astronaut Dave Scott in our Q&A below and that is the watch that will be auctioned by RRAuction on October 22nd 2015.




    142:14:22 Scott: “Verify cabin at 3.5.” Okay, cabin’s at 3.5. Suit circuit’s locked up at about 4.4. My PGA is coming through 5 and decaying. And let’s slip on a watch.




    [Dave may have had his watch hanging from the instrument panel and, in any event, he is now putting it on and is probably starting the stopwatch function.]
    [Scott, from a 1996 letter – “I do not recall ever having looked at my watch after egress. In the cabin after EVA-2, I noticed that the crystal of my Omega had popped off sometime during the EVA. Therefore, on EVA-3, I used my backup watch (which was) of a similar type. It worked just fine during the even higher temperatures of EVA-3.”]




    [In Dave’s 1996 letter to me, he said that the back-up watch was a Waltham. After further researching the issue for an article on watches, Dave wrote in early 2014, “Frankly, back in 1996 I just made a mistake — it was a Bulova, not a Waltham. When you asked in ’96, things were a bit hazy after 25 years, and I hadn’t fully researched many of the ancillary parts of the mission. However, more things are coming into focus these days as more people are researching Apollo.”




    Dave has documentation that tells us that the backup watch he wore on the lunar surface was a Bulova Chronograph, Model #88510/01. The Part Number on the wrist band was SEB12100030-202.]




    [Ken Glover has provided a video frame frame EVA-3, showing the watch Dave was wearing at that time. See, also, AS15-88-11863.]




    142:14:42 Scott: Okay. Ready. “Forward dump valve to Open.”




    142:14:44 Irwin: Okay, going Open.




    [The EVA has started.]




    Fratello Watches had a unique opportunity to ask Gemini 8, Apollo 9 and Apollo 15 astronaut Dave Scott a couple of questions regarding that back-up Bulova chronograph that he wore on the surface of the Moon. A watch that will surely be an interesting auction item on October 22nd for those interested in the space program as well as watch geeks, or a combination of the two.




    Fratello Watches: How did you end-up with the Bulova Chronograph? Is it something you brought in privately and just wore it?




    Dave Scott: Approximately four months before the mission, through a good friend and colleague, I was contacted by corporate management of Bulova requesting that I evaluate the Bulova Chronograph during Apollo 15. I informed Bulova that




    I would attempt to give the Bulova a full evaluation during many typical types of space activity.




    As we drew closer to the mission, and began to comprehend the increasing complexity and risk of the mission, it became apparent that minimizing risk would involve as many back-up capabilities as practical. In particular, certain situations would occur that required a precise knowledge of oxygen and water remaining in our backpacks such that we could return to the safety of the Lunar Module before our life support consumables expired.




    Under certain anticipated operational conditions, the only method of monitoring these vital systems was with a wrist chronograph. I only had the NASA-provided Omega Speedmaster, which was a single point failure under these conditions, a failure that could have resulted in the loss of the mission and/or the crew. As a matter of prudence, I then decided that I would also carry the Bulova as a back-up. After the mission, only my supervisor and my crew knew that the Bulova had been carried, Bulova was not informed.




    FW: The Bulova shows some similarities with the Omega Speedmaster, was that of importance to you?




    DS: Yes, the Bulova appeared to be in the same functional configuration as the Omega; and thus a similar timepiece for the task at hand.




    FW: Did James Ragan (responsible for the procurement of the Omega watches at the time) have a say in this as well?




    DS: I did not know James Ragan.




    FW: How would you rate it against the NASA issued Speedmaster Professional and why did you use the Bulova as a backup?




    DS: I did not make a direct comparison of the Bulova with the Omega. The Bulova was used because it was available and precluded the loss of timekeeping due to some generic problem or failure with the Omega.




    FW: Did you use the chronograph to time certain events or activities during the mission?*




    DS: The watch was available for lunar surface activities (as summarized above) as well as for timing the arrival at the Earth’s atmospheric interface, discussed below.




    The reentry into the atmosphere upon to return to Earth was one of the most time-critical events of the mission. The events onboard the spacecraft were all based on a specific time at which the Command Module would begin to enter the atmosphere (an altitude of 400,000 feet) – the “Entry Interface” (“EI”). The precise time at which EI would occur was based on tracking from the Mission Control Center – all events prior to and subsequent to the time of Entry Interface were based on elapsed time; that is the minutes and seconds before the EI and the minutes and seconds after the EI, such as the beginning of computer guidance, communications “blackout”, parachute deployment, and splashdown.




    As an example, precisely 28 seconds after the EI was the exact time at which the atmospheric force on the spacecraft was .05G, or 1/20th*of a G. At this point a .05G light would illuminate and the computer would begin its reentry guidance program.




    Should this not occur at the precise 28 seconds after EI, the spacecraft would be on an off-nominal trajectory and could either skip out of the atmosphere or potentially never return, or it could dig into the atmosphere and be destroyed by heating or excess G-force. Therefore, the timing of the EI was absolutely critical; and although the spacecraft had a timer, and each crewman had a watch, the backup Bulova provided an extra margin of safety




    FW: How did the Bulova end up in a private collection?




    DS: The “private collection” is my personal collection of A-15 memorabilia.




    FW: Had the crystal not popped off your NASA-issued Omega Speedmaster and the Bulova watch remained inside the lunar module, what were your original plans for testing or assessing the latter while on the moon or during the mission?




    DS: I had no specific plans; the Bulova would have remained stowed.




    FW: Did you use the Bulova at any other times during the mission, especially prior to EVA-3?




    DS: No. I used the Bulova during EVA-3 and all subsequent activities including two days in lunar orbit, transfer from the Moon to the Earth, and Earth reentry and splashdown.




    FW: Do you remember specifically using the Bulova during EVA-3? If so, when and what were you doing?




    DS: I do not recall any specific use, but it was on my wrist from the moment I suited up for EVA-3 until I took it off after the mission completion. In the event that I had to rely on it as a backup in any number of known or unknown situations




    it was immediately available.




    FW: The Bulova watch, as offered, is attached to the velcro watchband that you also used with your issued-Omega Speedmaster on EVA-1 and EVA-2.




    DS: True.




    FW: Do you recall if you had to remove the Bulova from another watchband to use it on EVA-3? Was that another velcro wristband, or was it a different type of bracelet? What became of that bracelet?




    DS: The Bulova was most likely stowed without a band (I may still have the original Bulova band, but it could not be worn with a pressurized suit. The cloth Velcro watchband now attached was required for the watch to be used both suited and unsuited.




    FW: After the mission, what happened with the watch? Were they ever provided to Bulova for assessment?




    DS: NASA post-flight personnel collected all equipment on board the spacecraft and subsequently gave the Bulova back to me. I do not know what occurred between splashdown and delivery to me.




    FW: Was there ever any comparisons made between the watch’s performance and the Speedmaster’s?




    DS: Not by me. We had a very full mission for which to prepare, so I was not able to compare the watches performance directly. However, I was aware that the Bulova had apparently passed all of the NASA watch performance and qualification requirements.




    FW: You had previously told the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal (among others) that the watch brand was Waltham. When and how did you discover your mistake and do you know what led to you misidentifying it earlier?




    DS: In 1996, 25 years after the mission, I was queried about a backup watch. At that time I slightly recalled that it was a Waltham. However, in 2014, after further researching the issue for an article on watches, I concluded that frankly, back




    in 1996, I just made a mistake — it was a Bulova, not a Waltham. Knowing what watch I wore was not a priority during mission discussions, especially in light of the complexity of our flight to the Moon, and I hadn’t fully researched many of the ancillary parts of the mission. However, more things were coming into focus in 2014 as more people were beginning to research Apollo in more depth.




    FW: What do you hope the watch’s new owner does with it? Would you like to see it publicly displayed?




    DS: Hopefully the new owner will share it with as many interested parties as practical.




    We want to thank Dave Scott for answering our questions. More information about the Bulova Chronograph watch that will be auctioned by RRAuction can be found here.




    Traducido al castellano




    El astronauta Dave Scott de la NASA (1932) fue la séptima persona que caminó sobre la Luna durante la misión Apolo 15 en 1971. Antes de la misión Apollo 15, Scott participó como piloto en la misión Gemini 8 y como piloto del Módulo de Mando a bordo del Apollo 9. En la misión Apollo 15 se convirtió en el primero en conducir por la Luna el Lunar Rover.




    Al igual que cualquier otro astronauta de Apollo, Dave Scott recibió un Omega Speedmaster Professional con un movimiento de calibre 321, mientras que Omega entregó referencias 105.012 y 145.012 a la NASA poco después de que Omega fuera oficialmente anunciada como proveedor de los relojes utilizados para Actividades Extra Vehículares (EVA)
    La transcripción publicada del segundo EVA de la misión Apolo 15 (ver más abajo un extracto) muestra información interesante. Parece que después del EVA-2, Dave Scott notó que el cristal de su Omega Speedmaster Professional se había caído cuando volvió a la cabina. Durante el EVA-3 por lo tanto, utilizó su reloj de reserva. Durante mucho tiempo, la gente (incluyendo Dave Scott) pensó que era un Waltham. Sin embargo, en 2014 se enteró de que no era un Waltham sino un Bulova. Un cronógrafo Bulova modelo 88510/01. Ese es el reloj que estamos a punto de discutir con el astronauta Dave Scott en nuestra siguiente entrevista y que será subastado por RRAuction el 22 de octubre de 2015.




    142: 14: 22 Scott: "Verificando la cabina a 3.5." Bueno, la cabina está a 3.5. El circuito del traje está bloqueado a 4.4. Mi PGA está en 5 y bajando.




    [Dave puede haber tenido su reloj colgado del tablero de instrumentos y, en cualquier caso, ahora lo está poniendo y probablemente está ejecutando el cronómetro.]




    [Scott, en una carta de 1996 - "No recuerdo haber mirado mi reloj después de la salida. En la cabina después de EVA-2, me di cuenta de que el cristal de mi Omega se había caído en algún momento durante el EVA. Por lo tanto, en EVA-3, he usado mi reloj de seguridad (que era) de un tipo similar. Funcionó muy bien durante las temperaturas aún más altas del EVA-3. "]




    [En la carta que Dave me escribió en 1996, me dijo que el reloj de respaldo era un Waltham. Después de seguir investigando el tema en un artículo sobre relojes, Dave escribió a principios de 2014: "Francamente, en 1996 cometí un error - era un Bulova, no un Waltham. Cuando usted me preguntó en el '96, no tenía las cosas claras después de 25 años y yo no había investigado completamente muchas de las partes auxiliares de la misión. Dave tiene documentación que nos dice que el reloj de respaldo que usó en la superficie lunar fue un Bulova Chronograph, Modelo # 88510/01. El número de serie en la correa era SEB12100030-202.]




    [Ken Glover ha proporcionado un marco de marco de vídeo EVA-3, que muestra el reloj que Dave llevaba en ese momento. Véase, asimismo, AS15-88-11863.]




    142: 14: 42 Scott: De acuerdo. Listo. "Vuelvo a abrir la válvula de escape"




    142: 14: 44 Irwin: Está bien, está abierto.




    [El EVA ha comenzado.]




    Relojes Fratello tuvo una oportunidad única de preguntar al astronauta Dave Scott de las misiones Gemini 8, Apolo 9 y Apolo 15 un par de preguntas con respecto a ese cronómetro Bulova de respaldo que usó en la superficie de la Luna. Un reloj que seguramente será un artículo de subasta interesante el 22 de octubre para aquellos interesados en el programa espacial.




    Relojes Fratello: ¿Cómo acabaste con el Bulova Chronograph en tus manos? ¿Lo compraste y simplemente lo usaste?




    Dave Scott: Aproximadamente cuatro meses antes de la misión, a través de un buen amigo y colega, la dirección corporativa de Bulova contactó conmigo solicitando me que evaluase el Bulova Chronograph durante Apollo 15. Le informé que intentaría darle a Bulova una evaluación completa durante la actividad espacial.




    A medida que nos acercábamos a la misión y comenzamos a comprender la creciente complejidad y riesgo de la misión, se hizo evidente que minimizar el riesgo necesitariamos tantos aparatos de reserva como fuera posible. En particular, ocurrirían ciertas situaciones que requerían un conocimiento preciso del oxígeno y el agua que quedaba en nuestras mochilas de modo que pudiéramos volver con seguridad al Módulo Lunar antes de que estos se acabaran.




    En ciertas operaciones el único método para monitorear estos sistemas vitales fue con un cronógrafo de muñeca. Sólo tenía el Omega Speedmaster suministrado por la NASA, lo que fue un fallo que podría haber resultado la pérdida de la misión y / o la tripulación. Por previsión, decidí que también llevaría el Bulova como respaldo. Después de la misión, sólo mi supervisor y mi tripulación sabían que había llevado el Bulova ,además Bulova no fue informada.




    FW: El Bulova muestra algunas similitudes con el Omega Speedmaster, ¿era importante para ti?




    DS: Sí, el Bulova parecía tener la misma configuración funcional que el Omega; Y por lo tanto un reloj similar para la tarea en cuestión.




    FW: ¿James Ragan (responsable de la adquisición de los relojes Omega en ese momento) tuvo que ver algo en ello ?




    DS: No conocía a James Ragan.




    FW: ¿Cómo calificaría usted al Speedmaster Professional proporcionado por la NASA y por qué utilizó el Bulova como copia de seguridad?




    DS: No hice una comparación directa del Bulova con el Omega. El Bulova se utilizó porque estaba disponible por si ocurría algún problema genérico o fallo con el Omega




    FW: ¿Utilizó el cronógrafo para programar ciertos eventos o actividades durante la misión?




    DS: El reloj estaba disponible para las actividades de superficie lunar (como se indica más arriba), así como para el momento de re entrada a la atmosfera terrestre, que se discute a continuación.




    La re entrada en la atmósfera fue uno de los momentos más críticos de toda la misión. Los acontecimientos a bordo de la nave espacial se basaron todos en el momento en el que el Módulo de Comando esntrana a la atmósfera (una altitud de 400.000 pies) - la "Interfaz de Entrada" ("EI"). El momento exacto en que ocurriría la EI se basó en el seguimiento del Centro de Control de la Misión - todos los acontecimientos anteriores y posteriores al momento de la Interfaz de Entrada se basaron en el tiempo transcurrido; Que son los minutos y segundos antes de la EI y los minutos y segundos después de la EI, como el inicio del sitema de guiado por computadora, el cese de las comunicaciones, el despliegue de paracaídas y el amerizaje.




    A modo de ejemplo, precisamente 28 segundos después de la EI fue el momento exacto en que la fuerza atmosférica en la nave espacial era 0,5G, o 1/20 de G. En este punto una luz 0,5G se iluminaría en el ordenador y comenzaría a ejecutarse el Programa de seguimiento de reentrada a la atmósfera terrestre.




    Si esto no ocurriera en los 28 segundos posteriores a la EI, la nave espacial estaría en una trayectoria no nominal y podría saltar fuera de la atmósfera o potencialmente nunca volver, o podría entrar a la atmósfera y ser destruida por calentamiento o exceso de fuerza G fuerza. Por lo tanto, el momento de la EI era absolutamente crítico; Y aunque la nave espacial tenía un cronómetro, y cada tripulante tenía un reloj, el Bulova de reserva proporcionó un margen adicional de la seguridad.




    FW: ¿Cómo terminó el Bulova en una colección privada?




    DS: La "colección privada" es mi colección personal de recuerdos A-15.




    FW: Si el cristal de su Omega Speedmaster proporcionado por la NASA no se hubiera caído y el reloj Bulova hubiera permanecido dentro del módulo lunar, ¿cuáles eran sus planes originales para probar o evaluar este último mientras estaba en la luna o durante la misión?




    DS: No tenía planes específicos; El Bulova habría permanecido guardado.




    FW: ¿Utilizó el Bulova en cualquier otro momento durante la misión, especialmente antes de EVA-3?




    DS: No. Usé el Bulova durante el EVA-3 y en todas las actividades siguientes incluyendo dos días en órbita lunar, duranter el vuelo de la Luna a la Tierra, re entrada a la Tierra y amerizaje.




    FW: ¿Recuerdas específicamente usando el Bulova durante EVA-3? Si es así, ¿cuándo y qué estaba haciendo?




    DS: No recuerdo ningún uso específico, pero estaba en mi muñeca desde el momento en que me preparé para EVA-3 hasta que me lo quité al finalizar la misión. Estaba disponible para cualquier emergencia durante la misión.




    FW: Al reloj Bulova se le puso la correa de velcro también utilizada en su Omega Speedmanster durante los EVA-1 y EVA-2.




    DS: Es cierto.




    FW: ¿Recuerdas si tuviste que quitarle la correa original al Bulova para usarlo durante el EVA-3? ¿Era otra pulsera de velcro, o era un tipo diferente de pulsera? ¿Qué pasó con esa pulsera?




    DS: El Bulova probablemente fue guardado sin correa (todavía debo tener la correa original de Bulova, pero no se podía usar con un traje presurizado. La correa de velcro de tela se podía utilizar tanto con traje como sin él.




    FW: Después de la misión, ¿qué pasó con el reloj? ¿Se lo devolvió alguna vez a Bulova para su evaluación?




    DS: El personal de NASA después del vuelo se hizo con todo el equipo a bordo de la nave espacial y posteriormente me devolvió el Bulova. No sé qué ocurrió con él durante el espacio de tiempo entre el amerizaje hasta que me lo devolvieron.




    FW: ¿Hubo alguna comparación entre el rendimiento del reloj y el del Speedmaster?




    DS: Yo no hice ninguna comparación. Tuvimos toda una misión para la que prepararnos, así que no pude comparar directamente el rendimiento de los relojes. Sin embargo, era consciente de que el Bulova había pasado aparentemente todos los requisitos de rendimiento y calificación de reloj de la NASA.




    FW: Habías dicho anteriormente al Apollo Lunar Surface Journal (entre otros) que la marca de relojes era Waltham. ¿Cuándo y cómo descubriste tu error y sabes lo que te llevó a identificarte erróneamente antes?




    DS: En 1996, 25 años después de la misión, me preguntaron acerca de un reloj de reserva. En ese momento recordé un poco que era un Waltham. Sin embargo, en 2014, después de seguir investigando el tema de un artículo sobre relojes, llegué a la conclusión de que, en 1996, cometí un error: era un Bulova, no un Waltham. Saber qué reloj llevaba no era una prioridad durante los análisis de la misión, especialmente dada la complejidad de nuestro vuelo a la Luna, y yo no había investigado completamente muchas de las partes auxiliares de la misión. Sin embargo, nuevas informaciones aparecíeron en el 2014 cuando muchas mas personas estaban investigando el Programa Apollo en profundidad.




    FW: ¿Qué esperas que haga con el nuevo dueño del reloj? ¿Le gustaría verlo públicamente?




    DS: Esperemos que el nuevo propietario lo comparta con tantos interesados como sea posible.




    Queremos agradecer a Dave Scott por responder a nuestras preguntas. Más información sobre el reloj Bulova Chronograph que será subastado por RRAuction se puede encontrar aquí https://issuu.com/rrauction/docs/463-bulova





    Unique-astronaut-Chronograph-sells-for-US1.6-million-5-2 by Marcos, en Flickr








    IMG_20181126_152439-01 by Marcos, en Flickr








    IMG_20181202_135850-01 by Marcos, en Flickr








    A parte de esta interesante entrevista a Dave Scott os dejo también mas información sobre esta anéctoda recogida en la famosa página http://www.collectspace.com en que básicamente se cuenta lo mismo.




    Del Apollo 15, astronauta David Scott:




    142:14:22 Scott: "Verify cabin at 3.5." Okay, cabin's at 3.5. Suit circuit's locked up at about 4.4. My PGA is coming through 5 and decaying. And let's slip on a watch.
    [Dave may have had his watch hanging from the instrument panel and, in any event, he is now putting it on and is probably starting the stopwatch function.]
    [Scott, from a 1996 letter - "I do not recall ever having looked at my watch after egress. In the cabin after EVA-2,I noticed that the crystal of my Omega had popped off sometime during the EVA. Therefore, on EVA-3, I used my backup Waltham watch (which was) of a similar type. It worked just fine during the even higher temperatures of EVA-3.]".




    Traducido al castellano:




    En una carta de 1996 Scott comenta:




    En la cabina después del segundo EVA me di cuenta de que el cristal de mi Omega se había roto en algún momento durante mi EVA por lo que en el tercer EVA usé mi reloj de reserva, un Waltham que era de tipo similar el cual funcionó perfectamente durante el tercer EVA.




    Parece ser que un modelo de Waltman el cual se pensó en un primer momento que habia estado en la superficie de la Luna por rotura del cristal del Speedmaster de David Scott tampoco era cierto como mas adelante veremos por lo que se cae el mito de que el Speedmaster fue el único reloj que estuvo en la superficie de la Luna.




    WalthamChrono by Marcos, en Flickr




    A parte de los Speedmaster oficiales muchos astronautas llevaban un segundo o mas relojes ya sea por decisión personal o por que alguna marca en concreto se lo pedía para testarlos en el espacio.




    Fuente:




    http://www.collectspace.com/resource...escarried.html




    Another irregularity that has come to light in the investigation of Apollo 15 was that Scott had on board two timepieces (a wristwatch and stop watch) that were not part of the normal mission equipment. During the preflight training period, Scott had agreed to evaluate these timepieces for the manufacturer at the request of a friend. Thinking they might be useful, particularly for the possible emergency timing of a manually controlled propulsion maneuver, Scott carried them on the mission but without prior authorization. NASA has deliberately withheld the name of the manufacturer of the timepieces to avoid commercialization of this unauthorized action.




    Tradución al castellano:




    Otra irregularidad que ha salido a la luz sobre la investigación de Apolo 15 es que Scott llevaba a bordo dos relojes (un reloj de pulsera y cronómetro) que no formaban parte del equipo normal de la misión. Durante el período de entrenamiento previo al vuelo, Scott había acordado evaluar estos relojes para el fabricante y a petición de un amigo. Pensando que podrían ser útiles, para alguna emergencia como alguna maniobra de propulsión controlada manualmente, Scott los llevó a la misión pero sin autorización previa. La NASA ha retenido deliberadamente el nombre del fabricante de los relojes para evitar la comercialización de las piezas no autorizadas.
    Cronómetro Bulova




    apollo-15-bulova-stop-watch by Marcos, en Flickr




    Pero volviendo a la anécdota del Waltham ahora parece que Scott olvidó que reloj llevaba en realidad resulta que no fue un Waltham como había dicho él mismo sino que fue un Bulova con referencia #88510/01 guardado durante años en una caja fuerte junto a un cronómetro de cabina también Bulova y que al venderse en 2011 este último y alcanzar una cifra considerable se descubrió que en realidad fue un Bulova tal y como asegura el coleccionista Larry McGlynn que fue quien lo compró.




    Apollo15AstronautDaveScott-BulovaChronograph-04 by Marcos, en Flickr
    Apollo15AstronautDaveScott-BulovaChronograph-03 by Marcos, en Flickr
    Apollo15AstronautDaveScott-BulovaChronograph-01 by Marcos, en Flickr








    IMG_20181128_101404-01 by Marcos, en Flickr




    IMG_20190107_160320-01 by Marcos, en Flickr




    IMG_20190107_155255-01 by Marcos, en Flickr




    McGlynn también asegura en este misma web de collectspace que Dave cometió un error al decir que llevó un Waltham:




    Dave made a mistake. Dave discussed it with Eric Jones 25 years after the fact and mistakenly remembered the backup watch as a Waltham watch. The watch has been (and still is) stored away in a safety deposit box. Dave retrieved the stopwatch for auction and found that both the stopwatch and the chronograph were made by Bulova. As Dave pointed out recently, this was a minor part of a major event that he participated in back in 1971. He reserves the right to be corrected every so often. Eric Jones has been notified by Dave over a week ago and the ALSJ is being updated at some point in the future.




    I purchased the stopwatch directly from Dave Scott in 2011. In 2014, as I researched the Bulova stopwatch for "The Watches of Apollo" article, Dave was extremely helpful in pulling all of his documents on the whole watch issue. I have photographs of the Bulova Chronograph model 01 now, so, yes, it is a Bulova watch.




    As for the the quote that I used in my story, it was from Dave Scott in a letter written by Dave to H.C. Titchell, Bulova VP of Public Relations on April 2, 1971. A summary of the letter is posted in the Bulova House notes on the matter.




    Traducción al castellano




    Dave cometió un error. Dave lo discutió con Eric Jones 25 años después del hecho y pensó que el reloj de reserva era un Waltham. El reloj estaba y todavía lo está guardado en una caja de seguridad. Dave recuperó el cronómetro para la subasta y encontró que tanto el cronómetro como el cronógrafo fueron hechos por Bulova. Como Dave señaló recientemente, esta fue una parte menor de un evento importante en el que él volvió a participar en 1971.




    Compré el cronómetro directamente de Dave Scott en 2011. En 2014, mientras investigaba el cronómetro de Bulova para el artículo"The Watches of Apollo" Dave fue de gran ayuda con toda la documentación de la que disponía sobre el reloj.




    Ahora tengo fotografías del modelo Bulova Chronograph 01, así que sí, es un reloj Bulova.




    En lo que se refiere a una cita que usé en mi historia, fue una carta escrita por Dave a H.C. Titchell, Vicepresidente de Relaciones Públicas de Bulova el 2 de abril de 1971a Dave Scott . Un resumen de esta carta se publica en las notas de la casa Bulova.




    De la página http://www.collectspace.com/ubb/Foru...ML/001199.html extraemos el siguiente fragmento que lo confirmaría:




    That would seem to confirm it was a Waltham-brand chronograph, and there has been speculation over the years about what model Waltham it was, but two more recent revelations have confirmed otherwise.
    In "Falling to Earth," Al Worden cited NASA Administrator Jim Fletcher's testimony before Congress:




    Fletcher told [committee chairman Clinton] Anderson that Dave had "carried a Bulova chronograph and a Bulova timer on the Apollo 15 flight, and these were not approved as items to be carried on the flight." Only two people at NASA knew about them, Dave explained: he and Deke. And even Deke didn't know until after the flight.




    In 2012, David Scott sold the flown Bulova timer and provided more details about its (and the chronograph's flight) aboard Apollo 15 to collector Larry McGlynn, who coincidentally wrote about it this month:




    In March of 1971, Bulova's representative, General James McCormick approached David Scott through a senior ranking officer, Colonel Frank Borman, to consider carrying a Bulova chronograph on his Apollo 15 mission to Hadley Rille in the




    Apennine Mountain range on the Moon. Scott agreed to "make every attempt to give the Bulova Chronograph a full evaluation" and, so, a Bulova watch was packed and stored in the lunar module for the flight.




    It is not clear why Scott previously wrote that the watch was made by Waltham, but the record now seems to be clear that the chronograph (and timer) was provided by Bulova.




    Estas palabras parecerían confirmar que era un cronógrafo de la marca Waltham, especulandose a lo largo de estos años qué modelo Waltham era, pero dos revelaciones más recientes han confirmado lo contrario.




    En "Falling to Earth", Al Worden citó el testimonio del Administrador de la NASA, Jim Fletcher ante el Congreso:




    Fletcher dijo a Anderson [al presidente del comité de Clinton] que Dave había "llevado un cronómetro Bulova y un temporizador Bulova en el vuelo Apolo 15, y estos no fueron aprobados como elementos para ser transportados en el vuelo".




    Sólo dos personas de la NASA sabían de ellos, Dave explicó: él y Deke. E incluso Deke no lo sabía hasta después del vuelo.




    En 2012, David Scott vendió el temporizador Bulova y proporcionó más detalles sobre él (y del cronógrafo) a bordo del Apolo 15 al coleccionista Larry McGlynn, quien escribió:




    En marzo de 1971, el general James McCormick se dirigió a David Scott a través de un oficial de alto rango, el coronel Frank Borman, para solicitar le que llevara un cronógrafo Bulova en su misión Apolo 15 a Hadley Rille ( cordillera de los Apeninos) en la Luna. Scott accedió a "hacer todo lo posible para hacer una evaluación completa al Bulova Chronograph " y, por lo tanto, un reloj Bulova fue embalado y almacenado en el módulo lunar para el vuelo.




    No está claro por qué Scott escribiera anteriormente que el reloj fuera un Waltham, pero ahora esá claro que el cronógrafo (y cronómetro) fueron proporcionados por Bulova.




    Parece ser entonces que queda despejada la duda aunque no deja de sorprenderme este curioso error de Dave, que el reloj que sustituyó al Speddy fue un Bulova.




    Dave Scott durante su EVA-2 donde todavía llevaba su Speedmaster




    Aollo 15 Scott Eva 2 Speedmaster by Marcos, en Flickr
    Dave Scott at Station 7 during EVA 2 by Marcos, en Flickr




    2019-01-07_05-38-41-01 by Marcos, en Flickr




    2019-01-07_05-39-11-01 by Marcos, en Flickr












    Una foto de Dave Scott durante un EVA en el Apollo 15. ¿Llevará ahí el Bulova? Se ve que lleva un reloj pero yo soy incapaz de distinguirlo. Según la casa de subastas RR Auction esta foto corresponde al EVA3 por lo que si sería el Bulova.




    news-093015a-lg by Marcos, en Flickr




    Astronaut David R. Scott, commander, gives a military salute while standing beside the deployed United States flag during the Apollo 15 lunar (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site by Marcos, en Flickr




    En esta otra imagen vemos a D. Scott junto al Rover Lunar








    Dave Scott’s Apollo 15 Chronograph Watch At Auction by Marcos, en Flickr




    y aquí vemos a Scott con el Bulova junto al resto de la tripulación del Apollo 15 siendo recogidos después del amerizaje.




    Apollo 15 by Marcos, en Flickr








    IMG_20190124_142126-01 by Marcos, en Flickr








    Pues eso es todo amigos, espero que hayáis disfrutado, saludos.

  2. #2
    Avatar de Ptr
    Ptr
    Ptr está en línea Milpostista

    User Info Menu

    Genial e interesante aporte. Muchas Gracias

  3. #3
    Avatar de pinon
    pinon está en línea De la casa

    User Info Menu

    El reportaje estupendo, como nos vienes acostumbrando . Pero aún estoy alunizando... perdón, alucinando por la caída del cristal del Omega, eso no dice cosas buenas de ese modelo, verdad?. Por lo leído me da la impresión que nosotros nos tomamos más en serio los relojes que fueron al espacio que los propios astronautas, que no sabían, -ni creo que les importase demasiado- que marca de reloj llevaban. Cómo dije, muy interesante el reportaje, Marcos!, muchas gracias!!

  4. #4
    Avatar de marctibu
    marctibu está en línea Habitual

    User Info Menu

    Cita Iniciado por Ptr Ver mensaje
    Genial e interesante aporte. Muchas Gracias
    Muchas gracias compañero, saludos.

    Cita Iniciado por pinon Ver mensaje
    El reportaje estupendo, como nos vienes acostumbrando . Pero aún estoy alunizando... perdón, alucinando por la caída del cristal del Omega, eso no dice cosas buenas de ese modelo, verdad?. Por lo leído me da la impresión que nosotros nos tomamos más en serio los relojes que fueron al espacio que los propios astronautas, que no sabían, -ni creo que les importase demasiado- que marca de reloj llevaban. Cómo dije, muy interesante el reportaje, Marcos!, muchas gracias!!
    Hola compañero, nada mas lejos de la realidad, lo del cristal no fué un hecho aislado le pasó a Duke durante el EVA3 en el Apollo 16

    Duke with the Speedmaster after it lost its crystal.on EVA3 by Marcos, en Flickr

    Ten en cuenta las diferencías de presión para entrar y salir de la capsula y temperaturas muy cambiantes en sitios con sol y sombra de mas de 200 grados, si algún reloj lo podía aguantar era el Omega.

    Para ello fue seleccionado después de pasar muchas pruebas a manos de Ragan y aunque no salió triunfante de todas, sus rivales fueron muchísimo peores.

    Por último en cuanto a los astronautas y sus relojes decirte que fueron ellos los que escogieron a Omega en un primer momento antes de que la NASA lo certificara y regulara su uso, ellos también querían lo mejor durante sus primeras misiones Mercury y Gemini.

    Saludos.

  5. #5
    Avatar de jolmo
    jolmo está desconectado Habitual

    User Info Menu

    Gran aporte, compañero; muchísimas gracias por compartir.
    Un saludo

    I am what I am

  6. #6
    Avatar de marctibu
    marctibu está en línea Habitual

    User Info Menu

    Cita Iniciado por jolmo Ver mensaje
    Gran aporte, compañero; muchísimas gracias por compartir.
    Un saludo
    Gracias por comentar, saludos.

  7. #7
    Avatar de boga
    boga está desconectado Habitual

    User Info Menu

    Enhorabuena por los 3000, Marcos.

    El post, en tu línea habitual de sapiencia, investigación, buena redacción y edición. ¡ Y qué decir de las fotografías !.

    Se echan de menos hilos como estos en el foro. Yo ya me cansé de hacerlos (aunque el gusanillo aún no ha muerto, y estoy preparando uno).

    Sobre el Bulova Lunar Pilot, ¿qué decir?. Ya me enamoré del original, antes de anunciarse que se iba a reeditar.

    Lo que no entiendo es porqué no lo han hecho a tamaño original (no era tan pequeño), y eso que les perdono que no sea mecánico, porque imagino que han tenido en cuenta lo que subiría de precios. Eso sí, sigue siendo precioso.

    Sobre la misión del Apollo 15, hay cosas que no me acaban de quedar muy claras (pero no es ilógico, pensando que fue una tripulación que se llevó ilegalmente sellos a la Luna, que fueron vendidos después. Cobraron 7000$ cada uno, pero fueron sancionados por la NASA cuando se descubrió, sin volar nunca más, pese a que devolvieron el dinero, intentando evitarlo).

    Me extraña que Scott se lleve dos Bulovas de estrangis a la Luna. Que use uno de ellos por avería (dice que, con lo necesario que era un reloj en los EVA, pensó en llevar un reloj de seguridad. ¿Es posible que eso no lo pensasen los de la NASA?). Y que luego, cuando le devolvieron los dos relojes que se llevó (el crono y el del EVA) los cierra en una caja fuerte. Y no se acuerda ni de la marca que eran.

    Realmente, se me hace muy dificil de creer.

    Magnífico hilo, Marcos. Gracias por tu tiempo.

  8. #8
    Avatar de miquel99
    miquel99 está en línea De la casa

    User Info Menu

    Que gran reportaje Marcos, ya lo tengo guardado en favoritos A ver si el compañero Boga se anima; son los dos referentes en historia espacial del foro. Muchas gracias.

  9. #9
    Avatar de marctibu
    marctibu está en línea Habitual

    User Info Menu

    Cita Iniciado por boga Ver mensaje
    Enhorabuena por los 3000, Marcos.

    El post, en tu línea habitual de sapiencia, investigación, buena redacción y edición. ¡ Y qué decir de las fotografías !.

    Se echan de menos hilos como estos en el foro. Yo ya me cansé de hacerlos (aunque el gusanillo aún no ha muerto, y estoy preparando uno).

    Sobre el Bulova Lunar Pilot, ¿qué decir?. Ya me enamoré del original, antes de anunciarse que se iba a reeditar.

    Lo que no entiendo es porqué no lo han hecho a tamaño original (no era tan pequeño), y eso que les perdono que no sea mecánico, porque imagino que han tenido en cuenta lo que subiría de precios. Eso sí, sigue siendo precioso.

    Sobre la misión del Apollo 15, hay cosas que no me acaban de quedar muy claras (pero no es ilógico, pensando que fue una tripulación que se llevó ilegalmente sellos a la Luna, que fueron vendidos después. Cobraron 7000$ cada uno, pero fueron sancionados por la NASA cuando se descubrió, sin volar nunca más, pese a que devolvieron el dinero, intentando evitarlo).

    Me extraña que Scott se lleve dos Bulovas de estrangis a la Luna. Que use uno de ellos por avería (dice que, con lo necesario que era un reloj en los EVA, pensó en llevar un reloj de seguridad. ¿Es posible que eso no lo pensasen los de la NASA?). Y que luego, cuando le devolvieron los dos relojes que se llevó (el crono y el del EVA) los cierra en una caja fuerte. Y no se acuerda ni de la marca que eran.

    Realmente, se me hace muy dificil de creer.

    Magnífico hilo, Marcos. Gracias por tu tiempo.
    Muchas gracias Antonio, la verdad es que coincido contigo sobre todo en la supuesta amnesia de Scott sobre la marca de su reloj, en cuanto a que los astronautas llevaran supuestos objetos a la Luna de manera furtiva lo veo mas plausible, mira sino lo que hizo Genin con su Pobeda y lo digo un poco para reafirmar el escaso control que existía y la poca rigurosidad con que las Agencias espaciales trataban estos casos.

    En cuanto a los posibles relojes extra llevados por algunos astronautas también es muy posible que así sea, ten en cuanta también que hasta las Misiones Apollo la NASA no tenía un reloj oficial con que proveer a sus astronautas. En las Misiones Mercury y Gemini fueron los propios astronautas los que escogían sus relojes e incluso las maquinas filmadoras, saludos.

    Cita Iniciado por miquel99 Ver mensaje
    Que gran reportaje Marcos, ya lo tengo guardado en favoritos A ver si el compañero Boga se anima; son los dos referentes en historia espacial del foro. Muchas gracias.
    Muchas gracias Miquel, si, yo también tengo ganas de ver ese nuevo hilo de Antonio, saludos.

  10. #10
    Jose Perez está en línea De la casa

    User Info Menu

    Uffff... ¡Qué interesante! Las fotos preciosas, la información completísima y el reloj uno de mis favoritos desde la primera vez que lo vi. ¡Enhorabuena!
    Mis relojes asequibles (Instagram): @watches_jibp

Página 1 de 2 12 ÚltimoÚltimo