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Hilo: El reloj de Jeremy Clarkson - Foro General

  1. #1
    Avatar de ollero
    ollero está desconectado Club de los 2000
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    17-oct-2005
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    Predeterminado El reloj de Jeremy Clarkson

    Los aficionados al automovil lo conocerán de sobra. Para los que no, decir que es un periodista inglés del motor, presentador del famoso programa Top Gear.

    Pues viendo esta mañana el último capítulo, me he fijado cómo no en el peluco que llevaba, y es todo un Planet Ocean con correa de caucho. Desde luego tiene tan buen gusto para los relojes como para los coches (Bueno, no le gusta el 911 )



    Y a modo de homenaje a Richard Hammond (recién salido del terrible accidente), decir que lleva un precioso Tag Heuer Monza Crono:



    Saludos
    Última edición por ollero; 01-feb-2007 a las 20:54
    La felicidad está en las pequeñas cosas: un pequeño yate, una pequeña mansión, una pequeña fortuna...

  2. #2
    Miguel V está desconectado Legión de Honor Forera
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    27-oct-2005
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    Predeterminado

    Si q tiene buen gusto el caballero......Saludos!

  3. #3
    Avatar de mandrake
    mandrake está desconectado Master of Fridays
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    06-mar-2006
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    Aunque no te gusten los coches, vale la pena oirlo...su columna del Times los domingos era lo unico que valia la pena del afamado periodico...
    "Creo que Madox lo sabe. Me habla de A. Karénina. Es su idea de charla entre hombres. Bueno, también es la mía.."

  4. #4
    Avatar de Jesús
    Jesús está desconectado Gran Cruz al Mérito Forero
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    Lo sigue siendo

    Then, after the opening few moments, we’re faced with the problem of showing the crash itself. Some of the footage is sickening, so obviously that will be screened in slow motion. But what about the rest? The build-up? The foreplay? The previous runs where all went well? Frankly, I think we should skip it all, go straight to the bone-crunching impact and then invite all the rubber-neckers who’ve only tuned in to see the little fella get brain damaged to bugger off and watch something more intellectually suitable. Big Brother — The Final, for example.

    http://driving.timesonline.co.uk/art...567606,00.html

  5. #5
    jucarlos75 está desconectado Forer@
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    :d :d :d :d :d
    Última edición por jucarlos75; 01-sep-2008 a las 01:27

  6. #6
    Avatar de ollero
    ollero está desconectado Club de los 2000
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    17-oct-2005
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    Gracias por el enlace, Juan Carlos. Efectívamente, somos muchos los que de vez en cuando seguimos el programa, no porque sea demasiado bueno (prefiero Fifth Gear), sino porque no hay otra cosa mejor en nuestra televisión

    Saludos
    La felicidad está en las pequeñas cosas: un pequeño yate, una pequeña mansión, una pequeña fortuna...

  7. #7
    Avatar de Super 8
    Super 8 está desconectado Legión de Honor Forera
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    Por lo visto, Clarkson no debe ser un entusiasta de los relojes. Éste es un artículo de hará 2 años, como éste hilo, con el que me he topado por casualidad.

    I'm calling time on silly watches

    <!-- END: Module - Main Heading --><!--CMA user Call Diffrenet Variation Of Image --><!-- BEGIN: Module - M24 Article Headline with portrait image (c) --><script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/js/m24-image-browser.js"></script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/js/tol.js"></script><!-- BEGIN: Module - M24 Article Headline with portrait image (c) --><script type="text/javascript"> <!-- /* Global variables that are used for "image browsing". Used on article pages to rotate the images of a story. */ var sImageBrowserImagePath = ''; var aArticleImages = new Array(); var aImageDescriptions = new Array(); var aImageEnlargeLink = new Array(); var aImageEnlargePopupWidth = '500'; var aImageEnlargePopupHeight = '500'; var aImagePhotographer = new Array(); var nSelectedArticleImage = 0; var i=0; //--></script><!-- BEGIN: Module - M24 Article Headline with pair of portrait images (c) --><!-- Print Author name from By Line associated with the article --> Jeremy Clarkson

    <!-- END: Module - Module - M24 Article Headline with pair of portrait images (c) --><!-- Article Copy module --><!-- BEGIN: Module - Main Article --><!-- Check the Article Type and display accordingly--><!-- Print Author image associated with the Author--><!-- Print the body of the article--><style type="text/css"> div#related-article-links p a, div#related-article-links p a:visited { color:#06c; } </style><!-- Pagination --> <!--Display article with page breaks --> After many years of faithful service, my watch has gone wrong. It just chooses random moments of the day to display meaningless times which, speaking as the world’s most punctual person, is a nuisance. Especially as I shall now have to go to a shop and buy a replacement.

    Yes, I know I could send it to the menders but, because I really am the most punctual person in the world, what am I supposed to do while it’s away? Use the moon? For me, going around without a watch is worse than going around without my trousers.
    Of course I have a back-up. My wife bought it for me many years ago with her last salary cheque and it’s very beautiful. But sadly my eyes are now so old and weary that I can’t read the face properly. Which means I turned up to meet an old friend one hour late last week. And that, in my book, is ruder than turning up and vomiting on him.
    It also brings me on to the biggest problem I’ve found in my quest to find a new timepiece. There’s a world of choice out there but everything is unbelievably expensive and fitted with a whole host of features that no one could possibly ever need.
    I have flown an F-15 fighter and at no point in the 90-minute sortie did I think: “Damn. I wish my watch had an altimeter because then I could see how far from the ground I am.” All planes have such a device on the dashboard.
    <!--#include file="m63-article-related-attachements.html"--><!-- Call Wide Article Attachment Module --><!--TEMPLATE:call file="wideArticleAttachment.jsp" /-->Similarly, when I was diving off those wall reefs in the Maldives I didn’t at any time think: “Ooh. I must check my watch to see how far below the surface I have gone.” Thoughtfully, God fitted my head with sinuses, which do that job very well already.
    You might think, then, that my demands are simple. I don’t want my new watch to open bottles. I don’t want it to double up as a laser or a garrotte. I just want something that tells the time, not in Bangkok or Los Angeles, but here, now, clearly, robustly and with no fuss. The end.
    But it isn’t the end. You see, in recent months someone has decided that the watch says something about the man. And that having the right timepiece is just as important as having the right hair, or the right names for your children, or the right car.
    Over dinner the other night someone leant across to a perfect stranger on the other side of the table and said: “Is that a Monte Carlo?” It was, apparently, and pretty soon everyone there was cooing and nodding appreciatively. Except me. I had no idea what a Monte Carlo was.
    Then we have James May, my television colleague, who has a collection of watches. Yes, a collection. But despite this he has just spent thousands of pounds on a watch made by IWC. Now I know roughly what he earns and therefore I know what percentage of his income he’s just blown on this watch and I think, medically speaking, he may be mad.
    It turns out, however, that his IWC, in the big scheme of things, is actually quite cheap. There are watches out there that cost tens or hundreds of thousands of pounds. And I can’t see why.
    Except of course, I can. Timex can sell you a reliable watch that has a back light for the hard of seeing, a compass, a stopwatch and a tool for restarting stricken nuclear submarines, all for &#163;29.99. And that’s because the badge says Timex. Which is another way of saying that you have no style, no sense of cool and that you may drive a Hyundai.
    To justify the enormous prices charged these days, watchmakers all have idiotic names, like Gilchrist & Soames, and they all claim to make timepieces for fighter pilots and space shuttle commanders and people who parachute from atomic bombs into power boats for a living. What’s more, all of them claim to have been doing this, in sheds in remote Swiss villages, for the last six thousand years.
    How many craftsmen are there in the mountains I wonder? Millions, by the sound of it.
    Breitling even bangs on about how it made the instruments for various historically important planes. So what? The Swiss also stored a lot of historically important gold teeth. It means nothing when I’m lying in bed trying to work out whether it’s the middle of the night or time to get up.
    Whatever, these watch companies give you all this active lifestyle guff and show you pictures of Swiss pensioners in brown store coats painstakingly assembling the inner workings with tweezers, and then they try to flog you something that is more complicated than a slide rule and is made from uranium. Or which is bigger and heavier than Fort Knox and would look stupid on even Puff Diddly.
    I think I’ve found an answer, though. There’s a watch called the Bell & Ross BR 01-92 which, according to the blurb, is made in Switzerland from German parts by a company that supplies the American military and is used regularly by people who make a living by being fired from the gun turrets of Abrams M1 tanks while riding burning jet-skis.
    Who cares? What I like is that it’s very simple and has big numbers, but what I don’t know is whether it’s reliable and whether people laugh at you because of it at dinner parties. Anyone got one? Anyone know?



    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/com...icle620488.ece

  8. #8
    Avatar de lorderer
    lorderer está desconectado Club de los 2000
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    La verdad si que tiene buen gusto para los relojes.Tienes toda la razon igual que para los coches

  9. #9
    Avatar de Ruag
    Ruag está desconectado Forer@ Senior
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    No sé si habréis visto el especial de top gear donde recorren 1200 km con 3 coches diesel y 1 sin parar a repostar. Ahí sale el señor Clarkson con una auténtica paellera blanca con la corona a la izquierda que no soy capaz de saber cual es. Al que le gustan de verdad los relojes y tiene una buena colección es May.

  10. #10
    Avatar de Super 8
    Super 8 está desconectado Legión de Honor Forera
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    Cita Iniciado por Ruag Ver mensaje
    No sé si habréis visto el especial de top gear donde recorren 1200 km con 3 coches diesel y 1 sin parar a repostar. Ahí sale el señor Clarkson con una auténtica paellera blanca con la corona a la izquierda que no soy capaz de saber cual es. Al que le gustan de verdad los relojes y tiene una buena colección es May.
    Ya. Si lees lo de arriba, verás que lo de la paellera es porque le cuesta leer la hora. Y que de May piensa que está médicamente loco por gastarse miles de libras en un IWC....

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