Página 1 de 2 12 ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 1 al 10 de 14

Hilo: El arte de vender un reloj - Foro General

  1. #1
    Avatar de bodhy78
    bodhy78 está en línea Forer@ Senior
    Fecha de ingreso
    10-sep-2007
    Ubicación
    Paraíso
    Mensajes
    502

    Predeterminado El arte de vender un reloj

    He encontrado este articulo y me ha resultado interesante su lectura.

    Trata de como un vendedor de una relojeria vende sus relojes y el modo en que trata a sus clientes, normalmente solemos leer en el foro experiencias de los compañeros de como les atienden....en este caso lo vemos desde el punto de vista de quien lo vende.

    Normalmente no posteo cosas en ingles ya que son de lectura mas pesada y no asequibles para todo el mundo pero me ha gustado y os lo dejo por si os apetece dedicarle un rato.

    Fuente: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...707126380.html

    When a man in a Cartier watch stepped into the IWC Schaffhausen boutique in Beverly Hills recently, salesman Hua Huynh sprang into action. He led the customer to a case of Aquatimers, the Swiss brand’s line of self-winding dive watches. “What’s the damage?” asked the customer, pointing at one model. “The value is $5,800,” replied Mr. Huynh. “Would you like to try it?”
    Hovering nearby, Jean-Marie Brücker winced.
    After the gentleman replied, “Nahh,” and left, Mr. Brücker closed in on the salesman. Instead of asking a yes-or-no question, he chided, “next time, you say, ‘I invite you to try the watch. Please take a seat.’ ” He pantomimed swiftly laying the watch on a suede-lined tray, leaving the customer no easy out.
    Mr. Brücker, a former Xerox salesman, is training IWC Schaffhausen’s sales force to sell expensive watches in a recession. After years of double-digit sales growth, sales of Swiss watches have fallen off drastically. Watchmakers like IWC—a 140-year-old company whose watches are considered collectors’ items and generally cost between $3,000 and $300,000—are having to re-learn the old-fashioned art of salesmanship.
    The worst declines for Swiss watches are in the U.S., where sales fell 42% in May from a year earlier, according to the Swiss Watch Federation. The slowdown is visible at watch-collecting events. A lavishly catered party in Los Angeles for Breitling, another watch maker, recently drew fans who dined and sipped champagne, but the table displaying Breitling’s latest models was the loneliest in the place. Breitling, too, is getting creative, experimenting with holding sales events to which wives aren’t invited. “We’re finding they buy more when their wives aren’t there,” says Marie Bodman, chief executive of Breitling USA.
    These days, at least 60% of customers enter high-end watch boutiques to service their own watches rather than to buy new ones, says Mr. Brücker, who coaches salespeople to lavish attention on these mostly disgruntled clients in order to rebuild their loyalty.
    Mr. Brücker has come far from his Xerox roots. As chief executive of Pôle Luxe, a Paris-based luxury-sales consulting group, he lists numerous high-end brands, including Cie. Financière Richemont, which owns IWC as well as Cartier and Van Cleef & Arpels, among his clients. His business is booming in the recession. He is opening new offices in New York, Hong Kong and Shanghai. He drives a Ferrari and has 61 luxury watches of his own, including four IWCs.
    I observed his training of IWC associates for two days, watching as Mr. Brücker urged his students to say “value” rather than “price” and to sell “romance” rather than “products.” Benoit de Clerck, president of IWC North America, and Frederick Martel, the company’s marketing director, scribbled notes and peppered him with questions alongside their salespeople.
    Mr. Brücker looked the part of a luxury customer, wearing Car Shoe moccasins and an IWC Big Pilot watch, which has shock absorbers to help it keep time under rough flying conditions. He used PowerPoint to impart what he calls the “macaroon technique,” referring to the sandwich-like French macaron pastry. This can be applied to most any product (including, presumably, a Xerox machine) and goes something like this: “Madam, this timepiece (or diamond or handbag) comes from our finest workshop and it has a value of $10,000. If you buy it, your children are sure to enjoy it for generations to come.”
    That pesky number is sandwiched between the product’s more romantic benefits. “We sell luxury—it’s an emotion,” Mr. Brücker instructed.
    Flattery sells, so to further those positive emotions, he insists that sales associates compliment the customer’s own watch, even if it’s from a competitor.
    But don’t expect to bargain with his clients. He coaches them to offer a gift if a discount is requested. “The minute you leave the boutique, you forget” the discount, he said. A closet in IWC’s boutique is filled with coffee mugs, umbrellas, watch-winding devices and the like.
    His methods dictate that salespeople lay the client’s well-worn watch on a tray between two shiny new ones, creating a contrast that subtly suggests it’s time to upgrade.
    Because guilt over spending is playing a big role in the sales downturn, he teaches salespeople to suggest a “sorry gift”—of another timepiece—for a wife who might be disappointed that her husband just dropped a sizable sum on his own wrist.
    On the second day of training, shop manager Arnaud Gouel moved in to welcome a couple. He amiably toured them through the boutique and offered them a coffee from the store’s Nespresso machine. Then he donned black gloves and placed the gentleman’s watch on a tray between two IWC timepieces. He strapped a rugged but elegant Big Pilot on the man’s wrist.
    Mr. Brücker, hovering nearby, sent Mr. Huynh over to offer the wife a watch. “It’s not to sell her a watch. It’s to occupy her,” he whispered. “She’s bored and she will say, ‘OK, let’s go.’ ”
    These happen to be key tenets of casino marketing, which revolves around flattering men, distracting their wives, and keeping them around as long as possible; the longer they stay, the more likely they are to spend money. But Mr. Brücker was never disdainful of customers—in fact, he championed the need for better, more thoughtful service that makes the customer sense caring and quality —the stuff of luxury.
    “You’re selling pure emotion,” he said. “That’s why I love this job.”

  2. #2
    Avatar de sevijuanillo
    sevijuanillo está desconectado Forer@ Senior
    Fecha de ingreso
    12-ene-2009
    Ubicación
    sevilla
    Mensajes
    914

    Predeterminado

    Las técnicas de venta tienen que perfeccionarse, sobre todo en estos tiempos. Muy bueno lo de los descuentos, que se olvidan al salir de la tienda y lo de entretener a las señoras, jaja. Buen artículo del Wall Street Journal.

  3. #3
    Rodolfo Salinas está desconectado Club de los 2000
    Fecha de ingreso
    11-feb-2009
    Ubicación
    Ni de aquí ni de allá
    Mensajes
    2,314

    Predeterminado

    Me parece una perfecta estupidez, si algo me desagrada profundamente es ese trato pomposo y salamero, y que cambien un descuento por un paraguas, pues sólo que se compre un casio. Para mi es simple, pido un trato correto y que el vendedor pelee el mejor precio para mi. Cuando llego a comprar un reloj ya investigué sus característcas y precio y me importa un bledo si me dan una copa de champagne o vino.

  4. #4
    Avatar de MANOLER
    MANOLER está desconectado Legión de Honor Forera
    Fecha de ingreso
    19-jul-2009
    Ubicación
    Dos Hermanas ( sevilla)
    Mensajes
    6,194

    Predeterminado

    ein????
    Nunca olvidaré que distes tu vida por mi escudo

  5. #5
    Avatar de Justigador
    Justigador está desconectado Forer@
    Fecha de ingreso
    19-nov-2008
    Ubicación
    Alicante
    Mensajes
    143

    Predeterminado

    Interesante articulo. Gracias por el link

  6. #6
    Avatar de Maese
    Maese está desconectado Antiguos Moderadores
    Fecha de ingreso
    01-ago-2007
    Ubicación
    Madrid
    Mensajes
    3,559

    Predeterminado

    Cita Iniciado por Rodolfo Salinas Ver mensaje
    Me parece una perfecta estupidez, si algo me desagrada profundamente es ese trato pomposo y salamero, y que cambien un descuento por un paraguas, pues sólo que se compre un casio. Para mi es simple, pido un trato correto y que el vendedor pelee el mejor precio para mi. Cuando llego a comprar un reloj ya investigué sus característcas y precio y me importa un bledo si me dan una copa de champagne o vino.
    Ahí le has dao Rodolfo, por eso compro la mayor parte de mis relojes por internet.

  7. #7
    aristharcus está desconectado Milpostista
    Fecha de ingreso
    21-dic-2007
    Ubicación
    Totalmente globalizado
    Mensajes
    1,155

    Predeterminado

    >>>
    Breitling, too, is getting creative, experimenting with holding sales events to which wives aren’t invited. “We’re finding they buy more when their wives aren’t there,”
    >>>

    Las MDDs son universales, no hay duda
    ¿Speedy o Navitimer?... Los dos, claro!

  8. #8
    aristharcus está desconectado Milpostista
    Fecha de ingreso
    21-dic-2007
    Ubicación
    Totalmente globalizado
    Mensajes
    1,155

    Predeterminado

    Cita Iniciado por Rodolfo Salinas Ver mensaje
    Me parece una perfecta estupidez, si algo me desagrada profundamente es ese trato pomposo y salamero, y que cambien un descuento por un paraguas, pues sólo que se compre un casio. Para mi es simple, pido un trato correto y que el vendedor pelee el mejor precio para mi. Cuando llego a comprar un reloj ya investigué sus característcas y precio y me importa un bledo si me dan una copa de champagne o vino.
    Pues a mi me gusta que me hagan el servicio completo, aun conociendo perfectamente la dinámica del asunto. También disfruto de la negociación elegante, en la que nunca trato de ser agresivo en las formas. Y por supuesto no olvido los descuentos. Para mi la compra de una pieza si que es pura emoción, y lo disfruto muchísimo. Se trata de charme, y respecto al vendedor, o se tiene o no se tiene. Para piezas de un cierto valor, si no hay charme no hay venta.
    ¿Speedy o Navitimer?... Los dos, claro!

  9. #9
    Rodolfo Salinas está desconectado Club de los 2000
    Fecha de ingreso
    11-feb-2009
    Ubicación
    Ni de aquí ni de allá
    Mensajes
    2,314

    Predeterminado

    En mi caso el evento en si mismo no me es muy importante, muchas de mis piezas las he comprado por teléfono, hablo con el vendedor de la relojería en la que acostumbro ir, con el cuál mi trato es muy coloquial, de tú, platicamos un momento de como van las cosas, me dice que piezas me pueden interesar, si no las conozco las veo por Internet, negocio el precio y me las envía a la oficina y después las pago. Poco glamour, pero muy cómodo. Lo anterior lo he usado tanto para un Rolex, un AP o un Patek. Saludos.

  10. #10
    Avatar de fido
    fido está desconectado Forer@ Senior
    Fecha de ingreso
    07-jul-2008
    Ubicación
    Paseo Marítimo de Las Rozas-Madrid
    Mensajes
    704

    Predeterminado

    Opino, que el trato, la profesionalidad, y la orientación, son imprenscindibles...

    Yo casi todos mis relojes, se los cojo, a "mi relojero particular", aparte de orientarme, echarme la bronca cuando tiene que echármela, conocer mis gustos y debilidades y las de mi pareja, nos llena de detalles en forma de regalitos, que son muuuy bien recibidos (sobre todo, a mi pareja...el tío no es tonto!!)...y en cuato al champagne, no hace falta, nos tomamos nuestras sobremesas, fuera del ámbito profesional...


    Para mí, buen relojero, mejor profesional, y gran amigo.


    Buen enlace Bodhy

Página 1 de 2 12 ÚltimoÚltimo