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Ver la versión completa : todo lo que quiere saber sobre rolex y nunca dejo de preguntar



eufrasia
11-Nov-2007, 20:08
de todo, series, numeros, si se puede jugar al golf (para slice) el codigo del pais, que si sacas el holograma, que si lo dejas, que la garantia, que la maquinaria que lleva el cosmo no se que que preguntaba no se quien, de todo, como en botica

LETTER & SERIAL NUMBERS

Starting in 1987 Rolex started putting a letter in front of its serial numbers. The following is a list of letter and the year the series was introduced. Please note that it is not uncommon to find a mix of serial numbers mixed in. For example at my local AD here in Toronto they have Y, F and D serial watches available. What does this mean? Not much in terms of the watch itself other than the fact the the old serial number watches were/are less popular and they have had it sitting in their inventory for some time. This does not effect the factory warranty as it starts at the date of purchase and not the date of manufacturing.

R 1987
L 1988
E 1990
X 1991
N 1991 (Nov)
C 1992
S 1993
W 1994
T 1996
U 1997 (Aug)
A 1998 (Nov)
P 2000 (Jan)
K 2001 (Sep)
Y 2002 (Sep)
F 2003 (Sep)
D 2005 (Apr)
Z 2006 (May)

HOLOGRAM ON CASE-BACK

Does this guarantee the watch is real?

Absolutely not, the counterfeiters have been putting on a hologram sticker on the back for years. The holograms can be purchased by the sheets on ebay so do not assume that because the watch has a sticker on the back that it is real.

Do I decrease the value of the watch by removing it?

Not at all, since over time the sticker will wear and become a sticky mess. Also like I said above fake stickers can be bought so ppl these days don't really care if the sticker is on the back.


SUPERLATIVE CHRONOMETER OFFICIALLY CERTIFIED

What this means is that the watch has been tested by Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronometers (COSC) COSC is the swiss standard for testing watch movements. They are independent and every movement gets tested with the same standards.

A movement that is COSC certified is accurate from -4 to +6 seconds a day anything in that range is acceptable. So if your watch is slow 4 seconds a day or fast 6 seconds a day (or anywhere in between) don't worry about it.

SERVICING

How often should I service my Rolex?

NOTE: this is just the typical guideline that Rolex recommends in their literature, it is not engraved in stone, many have gone decades without servicing and have perfectly running timepieces.

The main thing is to have it pressure tested annually by a Rolex certified watchmaker, especially if it is a divers watch. The main reason for a annual check is to make sure that the case is waterproof. The test is free, if your watchmaker wants to charge you for it go to one that doesn't.

A full service should be done every 5-7 years depending on use. Note it is not uncommon for oils inside the movement to dry out if the watch is exposed to harsh climates. Also gaskets in the case could dry out quicker with extreme exposure to hot and cold.

Who should I get to do the servicing?

ROLEX Servicing centres can be found around the world and they do top notch work, however there are many great watch makers other there than can properly service Rolexes. Note though that in some parts of the world only Rolex certified watchmakers may order parts.

ALWAYS make sure that the watch maker you go to uses ORIGINAL ROLEX PARTS, there is nothing else that comes close to them, you will end up hurting your watch in the long run, there are many horror stories out there about cheap dials that flake off paint into the movement and what not.

Rolex Price List Current USA


NOTE SOME OLD MODELS LISTED AS THEY ARE STILL IN CIRCULATION WITH SOME DEALERS

14000 3,625.00 SS Air King
14010 3,675.00 SS Air King
14060M 4,525.00 SS Submariner No Date
16610 5,175.00 SS Submariner with Date
16613 7,825.00 TT Submariner with Date
11618 23,100.00 Gold Submariner with date
16610LV 5,525.00 50th Anniversary SS Submariner with Date
16600 5,375.00 SS Sea Dweller
16622 8,325.00 SS/Platinum full size Yachtmaster
16623 8,675.00 TT full size Yachtmaster
16628 22,550.00 Gold full size Yachtmaster
168622 7,800.00 Yacht Master 35mm (steel/plat)
168623 8,000.00 mens, $7,900-ladies Yacht Master 35mm (steel/18k)
168623 6,975.00 TT Mid-Size Yachtmaster Serti Dial
168628 20,050.00 Mid-Size Yachtmaster 18kt Yellow Gold
169622 6,900.00 Yacht Master 29mm (steel/plat)
169623 7,100.00 Yacht Master 29mm (steel/18k)
114270 4,250.00 SS Explorer
16570 5,000.00 SS Explorer II
16710 5,075.00 SS GMT II
116713 8,925.00 TT GMT II
116718 22,750.00 GMT II
16718 19,750.00 Gold GMT II
116520 7,900.00 SS Daytona
116523 12,675.00 TT Daytona Dial
116528 25,550.00 Yellow gold Daytona
116519 18,100.00 White Gold Daytona on a strap
116518 16,900.00 Yellow Gold Daytona on a strap
16203 5,725.00 TT DateJust with Jubilee Bracelet
116203 7,600.00 TT DateJust heavy Oyster bracelet
16233 5,775.00 TT DateJust Yellow Gold Fluted bezel/Jubilee Bracelet
116233 8,025.00 TT DateJust heavy Jubilee bracelet
116233 7,650.00 TT DateJust heavy Oyster bracelet
116200 4,950.00 SS DateJust heavy Oyster Bracelet
16200 3,800.00 SS DateJust plain bezel Oyster bracelet
16220 3,925.00 SS DateJust Engine Turned bezel Jubilee Bracelet
116233 7,325.00 TT DateJust New Hidden Clasp Bracelet
16234 4,525.00 SS Datejust Jubilee Bracelet
116261 8,175.00 TT DateJust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
116263 7,800.00 TT DateJust Turnograph Jubilee bracelet
116264 5,775.00 SS DateJust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
78273 5,650.00 TT DateJust Mid-Size Jubilee bracelet
118238 22,450.00 Day Date Fluted Bezel 18kt Yellow Gold Presidential bracelet
118208 21,100.00 Day Date 18kt Yellow Gold Oyster Bracelet
118209 23,400.00 Day Date White Gold smooth bezel Oyster bracelet
118206 40,350.00 Day Date Platinum smooth bezel Presidential bracelet



PRE OCT 02 2006 PRICE LIST

16610 4525.00 SS Submariner with Date
16613 7100.00 TT Submariner with Date
11618 20850.00 Gold Submariner with date
16610LV 4875.00 50th Anniversary SS Submariner with Date
14000 3250.00 SS Air King
14010 3300.00 SS Air King
14060 3800.00 SS Submariner no Date
16600 4700.00 SS Sea Dweller
16622 7850.00 SS/Platinum full size Yachtmaster
16623 8200.00 TT full size Yachtmaster
16628 20700.00 Gold full size Yachtmaster
168623 6975.00 TT Mid-Size Yachtmaster Serti Dial
16750 4450.00 SS Explorer II
16710 4525.00 SS GMT II
16713 7025.00 TT GMT II
16718 19750.00 Gold GMT II
116520 6950.00 SS Daytona
116523 11275.00 TT Daytona Serti Dial
116528 23400.00 Yellow gold Daytona
116519 18100.00 White Gold Daytona on a strap
116518 16900.00 Yellow Gold Daytona on a strap
16203 5725.00 TT Datejust with Jubilee Bracelet
116203 7025.00 TT Datejust heavy Oyster bracelet
16233 5775.00 TT Datejust Yellow Gold Fluted bezel/Jubilee Bracelet
116233 7325.00 TT Datejust heavy Jubilee bracelet
116233 7075.00 TT Datejust heavy Oyster bracelet
16200 3800.00 SS Datejust plain bezel Oyster bracelet
16220 3925.00 SS Datejust Engine Turned bezel Jubilee Bracelet
16234 4525.00 SS Datejust Jubilee Bracelet
116261 7550.00 TT Datejust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
116263 7800.000 TT Datejust Turnograph Jubilee bracelet
116264 5775.00 SS Datejust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
78273 5650.00 TT Datejust Mid-Size Jubilee bracelet
118238 20550.00 Day Date kt Yellow Gold Oyster bracelet
118209 21700.00 Day Date White Gold smooth bezel Oyster bracelet
118206 40350.00 Day Date Platinum smooth bezel Presidential bracelet


Cleaning your Rolex

This has been a topic of debate lately, and I think it is rather simple to keep your watches clean. Simple soap and water is what I have been using for over 15 years on all my watches with bracelets. I will say that using a dish-washing detergent is not advised as ppl have stated that the grease cutting properties will dry out the gaskets prematurely. If you wash your bracelet regularly there is no reason why a mild hand soap and your fingers wont wash your wash effectively. If you use a moisturising soap for your hands and that doesn't dry out your bracelet and watch will not be harmed. I rinse my watch on a weekly basis and have never had any issues of build up on them.

Now this is just a guide and is not the only way to wash your watch. Some Pol like to use a soft brush, but I have never had the need to do so.

Watch Winding Setting Etc.

By Bo. Spacedweller.


Let's take the example that you want to set you watch at PRECISELY 11 o'clock AM on the 27th. of May 2007.

Take the following steps: (important things are underlined and in red):

1) Unscrew the winding crown counterclockwise. Two or three turns, and then the winding crown should "pop out" in the "winding position". If not, make SURE that the winding crown is free of the threads before winding the watch. Reason: if you turn the winding crown clockwise while it is still on the threads and if you are NOT pushing the winding crown inward whilst turning it, you might damage the threads. So again: Make sure that the winding crown is free of the threads before winding the watch!

2) Now you give your watch at LEAST 30-40 FULL windings by the crown. Wind the watch by turning the crown CLOCKWISE and NOT "back and forth" as some do! The reason to wind the watch manually when it has stopped: That way you make sure that the watch is FULLY wound and will have its full power reserve. By just "shaking it to get it going" you will NOT get the full power reserve. Do not be afraid of "over-winding" the watch (there is a safety catch to prevent over winding), but about 30 full windings should be enough.

3) IMPORTANT STEP! Remember that our example states that you want to get your watch going at 11 AM (in the "morning")??

What you do BEFORE MOVING THE HANDS is to pull out the winding crown FULLY (time setting position) and then you turn the hands to make SURE that both the hour hand and minute hand stand at FIVE OR SIX o'clock!
Reason: the date change mechanism (date-wheel) could be harmed if you change the date MANUALLY during the period from 21 to 01 o'clock. So by setting the hour and minute hand well off that period is strongly advised.

4) (now back to the date): Push the winding crown back to the SECOND notch (date change notch) and then advance the date MANUALLY via the winding crown until you reach the date of YESTERDAY (in our example: the 26th. of May).

5) Then you - once again - pull out the winding crown to the LAST notch (time setting position) and stop the seconds hand (that is now running since you have wound the watch manually!) at EXACTLY 12 o'clock (easier now to synchronise with another watch!).

6) Then you advance the hands by turning the winding crown clockwise. Keep a close eye on the date window as you advance the hands!. IF the date changes at midnight to the date of our example then you will have to advance the hands another 11 hours so that the date will change correctly at next midnight. If the date does NOT change, you have to advance the hands accordingly.

7) If you want to make the minute hand points EXACTLY on the given minute when the seconds hand has reached "12" (or "60" seconds), then you must know that there is some "play" in the hands.
So if you just set the minute hand according to our example (EXACTLY 11 AM so that the minute hand will point exactly on the 12) then you will notice that by "one minute past 11 AM" the minute hand will NOT (or probably not!) point EXACTLY and spot on on the minute but rather somewhat (like 15 seconds) PAST it due to the "play" in the hands!

Solution: Following the example, turn the minute hand approximately TEN minutes PAST "11 AM" and then turn the minute hand BACK again to the EXACT time (hour hand point at "11" and minute and seconds hand pointing - exactly - on "12"). Then - EVER SO GENTLY - turn the winding crown clockwise so that the minute hand actually points a bit (like "15 seconds" PAST the full minute marker). That way you adjusted to the "play" of the minute hand, and the minute hand will point EXACTLY on the minute next time the seconds hand reaches "twelve".

8) When you have wound the watch, set the time and date, screw the winding crown back so that the watch is once again waterproof. By the way: You do not have to screw it very hard onto the case. As soon as you feel some resistance, stop using more force on the crown."

9)



Country Codes

As you may have noticed, on every Rolex Warranty certificate there is a 3 digit number that precedes the Serial number of your watch. This number is reference to which market the watch was originally sent to by Rolex factory. This information is useful in that you know where the watch originally came from if you are buying a used one.

010 - Switzerland
012 - Switzerland
013 - Switzerland
014 - Switzerland
015 - Switzerland
021 - Switzerland
022 - Switzerland
023 - Switzerland
025 - Switzerland
026 - Switzerland
033 - Switzerland
045 - Switzerland
100 - Germany
110 - France
113 - France
120 - Austria
121 - Austria
123 - Austria
126 - Austria
128 - Austria
130 - Belgium/Luxemburg
133 - Netherlands
134 - Netherlands
135 - Netherlands
136 - Netherlands
137 - Netherlands
138 - Netherlands
150 - Spain
160 - U.K
170 - Italy
200 - Greece
201 - Malta
202 - Turkey
208 - Greece
213 - Portugal
217 - Portugal
226 - Denmark
228 - Denmark
233 - Denmark
237 - Iceland
265 - Sweden
267 - Sweden
270 - Sweden
271 - Sweden
283 - Finland
321 - Czech Republic
400 - Hong Kong
413 - Korea
430 - Singapore/Brunai
431 - Malaysia
440 - Taiwan
500 - India
505 - Pakistan
527 - Middle East
532 - Saudi Arabia
533 - Kuwait
536 - Abu Dhabi
537 - Dubai
538 - Oman
542 - Iran
548 - Israel
680 - South Africa
700 - Canada
710 - USA
720 - Mexico
741 - Bahamas
742 - Bermuda
752 - Jamaica
758 - Virgin Islands
761 - Netherlands Antilles
762 - Aruba
765 - Antigua
766 - Saint Martin
767 - Grand Cayman
768 - Panama
770 - Venezuela
780 - Brazil
781 - Chile
790 - Argentina
810 - Australia
818 - Philippines
828 - China
838 - China
842 - New Zealand
871 - Hawaii
872 - Alaska
873 - Guam
888 - Hong Kong
900 - Japan
906 - Natex Retail, German NATO Airbase

Something to note is of the China and HK codes. Rolex knows about the Chinese and their superstitions and have chosen numbers that represent good luck and wealth through a play on the way the words for certain numbers are pronounced in Chinese (8s = wealth, 2= ease, 3= for life, in other words some of these codes mean easy wealth or wealth for life) now one of the codes for HK is 400 which is sort of bad (4 in Chinese sounds like the word for die) but I believe this is because the number was issued back before Rolex realised how superstitious the Chinese are.

When were they Introduced?

1926 Oyster Case
1927 Serial Number On Oyster Case
1931 Oyster Perpetual
1938 Bubble Back
1938 Oyster Bracelet
1945 Jubilee Bracelet
1945 Datejust
1950 "Mercedes" Hands
1953 Submariner 100m/330ft
1953 Explorer
1954 GMT-Master
1954 Submariner 200m / 660ft
1954 Cyclops (aka Magnifying bump on Crystal)
1954 Lady's Oyster Perpetual
1956 Day-Date
1956 President Bracelet
1959 Submariner gets Crown Guards and 40mm Case
1960 Deep Sea Special
1961 Oyster Cosmograph
1962 Cosmograph Daytona
1965 Submariner Date
1965 Submariner Date 18 k YG
1967 Sea-Dweller
1971 Explorer II
1972 Hacking Movement
1974 Sapphire Crystal
1976 Oysterquartz
1977 Oysterquartz Day-Date
1977 Quick Set Date Feature
1978 Sea-Dweller 4000
1979 Submariner 300m/1000ft with Sapphire Crystal
1983 GMT-Master II
1983 Submariner Rolesor (aka Sub TT)
1988 Cosmograph Daytona (Zenith Movement aka Cal. 4030)
1992 Yachtmaster
1994 Yachtmaster Lady & Mid-Sized aka Boys Size
2000 Cosmograph Daytona with new in-house Mvt (Cal. 4130)
2001 Laser Etched Hologram In Crystal
2003 "Green" Submariner Date (aka Anniversary Model with Maxi Dial)
2002 end of Y series early 2003. Non lugs holes started to make there appearence on most models.
2004 Serial Number On The Inner Bezel
2004 New Datejust Case
2005 New GMT-Master YG (Cal. 3186)
2006 New GMT-Master Rolesor (Cal. 3186)

--:Invitado:--
11-Nov-2007, 20:27
juer fernando, ¿has estado mucho rato al sol? :D

Montxo Grau
11-Nov-2007, 20:32
¡ Anda que no va a convertir alguna de esas triquiñuelas informáticas traductoras toda esta empanada ! , se lo pasaré a la de la radio y ya verás que, quizás, además de besitos de bienvenida me invita a un café, o más...:D :yhoo:: Saludos.

eufrasia
11-Nov-2007, 20:40
no hay mucho texto, la mayoria son datos, por ejemplo sale la lista de inventos de la rolex y por años, me acabo de enterar que el sd hace 40 años haciendose, y yo sin estos pelos !!! luego los precios, en dolares, despues las instrucciones pa ponerlo en hora con el truco ese del segundero que salta y tal...cositas...tabien no?

--:Invitado:--
11-Nov-2007, 20:42
Total, para luego ponerle al Rolex una nato..... :D

eufrasia
11-Nov-2007, 20:45
juassssssssssssss no viste el afoto del rolex con una canvas negra? hasta md20 reconocio que le queda bien, de santi ya lo esperaba, pero me parece que esta tarde ha habido algun cambio en el gusto de los foreros


Total, para luego ponerle al Rolex una nato..... :D

ICE
11-Nov-2007, 22:39
Pues que está interesante, compañero.

Otro truco -del almendruco- para que las manecillas estén donde deben: Cuando pongas la hora saca la de los segundos en la posición de las 9; paras el reloj y pones en hora. Cuando empiece a funcionar irán bien todas las agujas.

Saludetes

ICE

eufrasia
12-Nov-2007, 06:35
por la mañana habia visto uno mas completo en el foro americano, hablaba del "hot tube" y del golf, ahora no lo encuentro mecachis, continuaremos informando


¡ Anda que no va a convertir alguna de esas triquiñuelas informáticas traductoras toda esta empanada ! , se lo pasaré a la de la radio y ya verás que, quizás, además de besitos de bienvenida me invita a un café, o más...:D :yhoo:: Saludos.

monorelojero
13-Nov-2007, 15:36
de todo, series, numeros, si se puede jugar al golf (para slice) el codigo del pais, que si sacas el holograma, que si lo dejas, que la garantia, que la maquinaria que lleva el cosmo no se que que preguntaba no se quien, de todo, como en botica

LETTER & SERIAL NUMBERS

Starting in 1987 Rolex started putting a letter in front of its serial numbers. The following is a list of letter and the year the series was introduced. Please note that it is not uncommon to find a mix of serial numbers mixed in. For example at my local AD here in Toronto they have Y, F and D serial watches available. What does this mean? Not much in terms of the watch itself other than the fact the the old serial number watches were/are less popular and they have had it sitting in their inventory for some time. This does not effect the factory warranty as it starts at the date of purchase and not the date of manufacturing.

R 1987
L 1988
E 1990
X 1991
N 1991 (Nov)
C 1992
S 1993
W 1994
T 1996
U 1997 (Aug)
A 1998 (Nov)
P 2000 (Jan)
K 2001 (Sep)
Y 2002 (Sep)
F 2003 (Sep)
D 2005 (Apr)
Z 2006 (May)

HOLOGRAM ON CASE-BACK

Does this guarantee the watch is real?

Absolutely not, the counterfeiters have been putting on a hologram sticker on the back for years. The holograms can be purchased by the sheets on ebay so do not assume that because the watch has a sticker on the back that it is real.

Do I decrease the value of the watch by removing it?

Not at all, since over time the sticker will wear and become a sticky mess. Also like I said above fake stickers can be bought so ppl these days don't really care if the sticker is on the back.


SUPERLATIVE CHRONOMETER OFFICIALLY CERTIFIED

What this means is that the watch has been tested by Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronometers (COSC) COSC is the swiss standard for testing watch movements. They are independent and every movement gets tested with the same standards.

A movement that is COSC certified is accurate from -4 to +6 seconds a day anything in that range is acceptable. So if your watch is slow 4 seconds a day or fast 6 seconds a day (or anywhere in between) don't worry about it.

SERVICING

How often should I service my Rolex?

NOTE: this is just the typical guideline that Rolex recommends in their literature, it is not engraved in stone, many have gone decades without servicing and have perfectly running timepieces.

The main thing is to have it pressure tested annually by a Rolex certified watchmaker, especially if it is a divers watch. The main reason for a annual check is to make sure that the case is waterproof. The test is free, if your watchmaker wants to charge you for it go to one that doesn't.

A full service should be done every 5-7 years depending on use. Note it is not uncommon for oils inside the movement to dry out if the watch is exposed to harsh climates. Also gaskets in the case could dry out quicker with extreme exposure to hot and cold.

Who should I get to do the servicing?

ROLEX Servicing centres can be found around the world and they do top notch work, however there are many great watch makers other there than can properly service Rolexes. Note though that in some parts of the world only Rolex certified watchmakers may order parts.

ALWAYS make sure that the watch maker you go to uses ORIGINAL ROLEX PARTS, there is nothing else that comes close to them, you will end up hurting your watch in the long run, there are many horror stories out there about cheap dials that flake off paint into the movement and what not.

Rolex Price List Current USA


NOTE SOME OLD MODELS LISTED AS THEY ARE STILL IN CIRCULATION WITH SOME DEALERS

14000 3,625.00 SS Air King
14010 3,675.00 SS Air King
14060M 4,525.00 SS Submariner No Date
16610 5,175.00 SS Submariner with Date
16613 7,825.00 TT Submariner with Date
11618 23,100.00 Gold Submariner with date
16610LV 5,525.00 50th Anniversary SS Submariner with Date
16600 5,375.00 SS Sea Dweller
16622 8,325.00 SS/Platinum full size Yachtmaster
16623 8,675.00 TT full size Yachtmaster
16628 22,550.00 Gold full size Yachtmaster
168622 7,800.00 Yacht Master 35mm (steel/plat)
168623 8,000.00 mens, $7,900-ladies Yacht Master 35mm (steel/18k)
168623 6,975.00 TT Mid-Size Yachtmaster Serti Dial
168628 20,050.00 Mid-Size Yachtmaster 18kt Yellow Gold
169622 6,900.00 Yacht Master 29mm (steel/plat)
169623 7,100.00 Yacht Master 29mm (steel/18k)
114270 4,250.00 SS Explorer
16570 5,000.00 SS Explorer II
16710 5,075.00 SS GMT II
116713 8,925.00 TT GMT II
116718 22,750.00 GMT II
16718 19,750.00 Gold GMT II
116520 7,900.00 SS Daytona
116523 12,675.00 TT Daytona Dial
116528 25,550.00 Yellow gold Daytona
116519 18,100.00 White Gold Daytona on a strap
116518 16,900.00 Yellow Gold Daytona on a strap
16203 5,725.00 TT DateJust with Jubilee Bracelet
116203 7,600.00 TT DateJust heavy Oyster bracelet
16233 5,775.00 TT DateJust Yellow Gold Fluted bezel/Jubilee Bracelet
116233 8,025.00 TT DateJust heavy Jubilee bracelet
116233 7,650.00 TT DateJust heavy Oyster bracelet
116200 4,950.00 SS DateJust heavy Oyster Bracelet
16200 3,800.00 SS DateJust plain bezel Oyster bracelet
16220 3,925.00 SS DateJust Engine Turned bezel Jubilee Bracelet
116233 7,325.00 TT DateJust New Hidden Clasp Bracelet
16234 4,525.00 SS Datejust Jubilee Bracelet
116261 8,175.00 TT DateJust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
116263 7,800.00 TT DateJust Turnograph Jubilee bracelet
116264 5,775.00 SS DateJust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
78273 5,650.00 TT DateJust Mid-Size Jubilee bracelet
118238 22,450.00 Day Date Fluted Bezel 18kt Yellow Gold Presidential bracelet
118208 21,100.00 Day Date 18kt Yellow Gold Oyster Bracelet
118209 23,400.00 Day Date White Gold smooth bezel Oyster bracelet
118206 40,350.00 Day Date Platinum smooth bezel Presidential bracelet



PRE OCT 02 2006 PRICE LIST

16610 4525.00 SS Submariner with Date
16613 7100.00 TT Submariner with Date
11618 20850.00 Gold Submariner with date
16610LV 4875.00 50th Anniversary SS Submariner with Date
14000 3250.00 SS Air King
14010 3300.00 SS Air King
14060 3800.00 SS Submariner no Date
16600 4700.00 SS Sea Dweller
16622 7850.00 SS/Platinum full size Yachtmaster
16623 8200.00 TT full size Yachtmaster
16628 20700.00 Gold full size Yachtmaster
168623 6975.00 TT Mid-Size Yachtmaster Serti Dial
16750 4450.00 SS Explorer II
16710 4525.00 SS GMT II
16713 7025.00 TT GMT II
16718 19750.00 Gold GMT II
116520 6950.00 SS Daytona
116523 11275.00 TT Daytona Serti Dial
116528 23400.00 Yellow gold Daytona
116519 18100.00 White Gold Daytona on a strap
116518 16900.00 Yellow Gold Daytona on a strap
16203 5725.00 TT Datejust with Jubilee Bracelet
116203 7025.00 TT Datejust heavy Oyster bracelet
16233 5775.00 TT Datejust Yellow Gold Fluted bezel/Jubilee Bracelet
116233 7325.00 TT Datejust heavy Jubilee bracelet
116233 7075.00 TT Datejust heavy Oyster bracelet
16200 3800.00 SS Datejust plain bezel Oyster bracelet
16220 3925.00 SS Datejust Engine Turned bezel Jubilee Bracelet
16234 4525.00 SS Datejust Jubilee Bracelet
116261 7550.00 TT Datejust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
116263 7800.000 TT Datejust Turnograph Jubilee bracelet
116264 5775.00 SS Datejust Turnograph Oyster bracelet
78273 5650.00 TT Datejust Mid-Size Jubilee bracelet
118238 20550.00 Day Date kt Yellow Gold Oyster bracelet
118209 21700.00 Day Date White Gold smooth bezel Oyster bracelet
118206 40350.00 Day Date Platinum smooth bezel Presidential bracelet


Cleaning your Rolex

This has been a topic of debate lately, and I think it is rather simple to keep your watches clean. Simple soap and water is what I have been using for over 15 years on all my watches with bracelets. I will say that using a dish-washing detergent is not advised as ppl have stated that the grease cutting properties will dry out the gaskets prematurely. If you wash your bracelet regularly there is no reason why a mild hand soap and your fingers wont wash your wash effectively. If you use a moisturising soap for your hands and that doesn't dry out your bracelet and watch will not be harmed. I rinse my watch on a weekly basis and have never had any issues of build up on them.

Now this is just a guide and is not the only way to wash your watch. Some Pol like to use a soft brush, but I have never had the need to do so.

Watch Winding Setting Etc.

By Bo. Spacedweller.


Let's take the example that you want to set you watch at PRECISELY 11 o'clock AM on the 27th. of May 2007.

Take the following steps: (important things are underlined and in red):

1) Unscrew the winding crown counterclockwise. Two or three turns, and then the winding crown should "pop out" in the "winding position". If not, make SURE that the winding crown is free of the threads before winding the watch. Reason: if you turn the winding crown clockwise while it is still on the threads and if you are NOT pushing the winding crown inward whilst turning it, you might damage the threads. So again: Make sure that the winding crown is free of the threads before winding the watch!

2) Now you give your watch at LEAST 30-40 FULL windings by the crown. Wind the watch by turning the crown CLOCKWISE and NOT "back and forth" as some do! The reason to wind the watch manually when it has stopped: That way you make sure that the watch is FULLY wound and will have its full power reserve. By just "shaking it to get it going" you will NOT get the full power reserve. Do not be afraid of "over-winding" the watch (there is a safety catch to prevent over winding), but about 30 full windings should be enough.

3) IMPORTANT STEP! Remember that our example states that you want to get your watch going at 11 AM (in the "morning")??

What you do BEFORE MOVING THE HANDS is to pull out the winding crown FULLY (time setting position) and then you turn the hands to make SURE that both the hour hand and minute hand stand at FIVE OR SIX o'clock!
Reason: the date change mechanism (date-wheel) could be harmed if you change the date MANUALLY during the period from 21 to 01 o'clock. So by setting the hour and minute hand well off that period is strongly advised.

4) (now back to the date): Push the winding crown back to the SECOND notch (date change notch) and then advance the date MANUALLY via the winding crown until you reach the date of YESTERDAY (in our example: the 26th. of May).

5) Then you - once again - pull out the winding crown to the LAST notch (time setting position) and stop the seconds hand (that is now running since you have wound the watch manually!) at EXACTLY 12 o'clock (easier now to synchronise with another watch!).

6) Then you advance the hands by turning the winding crown clockwise. Keep a close eye on the date window as you advance the hands!. IF the date changes at midnight to the date of our example then you will have to advance the hands another 11 hours so that the date will change correctly at next midnight. If the date does NOT change, you have to advance the hands accordingly.

7) If you want to make the minute hand points EXACTLY on the given minute when the seconds hand has reached "12" (or "60" seconds), then you must know that there is some "play" in the hands.
So if you just set the minute hand according to our example (EXACTLY 11 AM so that the minute hand will point exactly on the 12) then you will notice that by "one minute past 11 AM" the minute hand will NOT (or probably not!) point EXACTLY and spot on on the minute but rather somewhat (like 15 seconds) PAST it due to the "play" in the hands!

Solution: Following the example, turn the minute hand approximately TEN minutes PAST "11 AM" and then turn the minute hand BACK again to the EXACT time (hour hand point at "11" and minute and seconds hand pointing - exactly - on "12"). Then - EVER SO GENTLY - turn the winding crown clockwise so that the minute hand actually points a bit (like "15 seconds" PAST the full minute marker). That way you adjusted to the "play" of the minute hand, and the minute hand will point EXACTLY on the minute next time the seconds hand reaches "twelve".

8) When you have wound the watch, set the time and date, screw the winding crown back so that the watch is once again waterproof. By the way: You do not have to screw it very hard onto the case. As soon as you feel some resistance, stop using more force on the crown."

9)



Country Codes

As you may have noticed, on every Rolex Warranty certificate there is a 3 digit number that precedes the Serial number of your watch. This number is reference to which market the watch was originally sent to by Rolex factory. This information is useful in that you know where the watch originally came from if you are buying a used one.

010 - Switzerland
012 - Switzerland
013 - Switzerland
014 - Switzerland
015 - Switzerland
021 - Switzerland
022 - Switzerland
023 - Switzerland
025 - Switzerland
026 - Switzerland
033 - Switzerland
045 - Switzerland
100 - Germany
110 - France
113 - France
120 - Austria
121 - Austria
123 - Austria
126 - Austria
128 - Austria
130 - Belgium/Luxemburg
133 - Netherlands
134 - Netherlands
135 - Netherlands
136 - Netherlands
137 - Netherlands
138 - Netherlands
150 - Spain
160 - U.K
170 - Italy
200 - Greece
201 - Malta
202 - Turkey
208 - Greece
213 - Portugal
217 - Portugal
226 - Denmark
228 - Denmark
233 - Denmark
237 - Iceland
265 - Sweden
267 - Sweden
270 - Sweden
271 - Sweden
283 - Finland
321 - Czech Republic
400 - Hong Kong
413 - Korea
430 - Singapore/Brunai
431 - Malaysia
440 - Taiwan
500 - India
505 - Pakistan
527 - Middle East
532 - Saudi Arabia
533 - Kuwait
536 - Abu Dhabi
537 - Dubai
538 - Oman
542 - Iran
548 - Israel
680 - South Africa
700 - Canada
710 - USA
720 - Mexico
741 - Bahamas
742 - Bermuda
752 - Jamaica
758 - Virgin Islands
761 - Netherlands Antilles
762 - Aruba
765 - Antigua
766 - Saint Martin
767 - Grand Cayman
768 - Panama
770 - Venezuela
780 - Brazil
781 - Chile
790 - Argentina
810 - Australia
818 - Philippines
828 - China
838 - China
842 - New Zealand
871 - Hawaii
872 - Alaska
873 - Guam
888 - Hong Kong
900 - Japan
906 - Natex Retail, German NATO Airbase

Something to note is of the China and HK codes. Rolex knows about the Chinese and their superstitions and have chosen numbers that represent good luck and wealth through a play on the way the words for certain numbers are pronounced in Chinese (8s = wealth, 2= ease, 3= for life, in other words some of these codes mean easy wealth or wealth for life) now one of the codes for HK is 400 which is sort of bad (4 in Chinese sounds like the word for die) but I believe this is because the number was issued back before Rolex realised how superstitious the Chinese are.

When were they Introduced?

1926 Oyster Case
1927 Serial Number On Oyster Case
1931 Oyster Perpetual
1938 Bubble Back
1938 Oyster Bracelet
1945 Jubilee Bracelet
1945 Datejust
1950 "Mercedes" Hands
1953 Submariner 100m/330ft
1953 Explorer
1954 GMT-Master
1954 Submariner 200m / 660ft
1954 Cyclops (aka Magnifying bump on Crystal)
1954 Lady's Oyster Perpetual
1956 Day-Date
1956 President Bracelet
1959 Submariner gets Crown Guards and 40mm Case
1960 Deep Sea Special
1961 Oyster Cosmograph
1962 Cosmograph Daytona
1965 Submariner Date
1965 Submariner Date 18 k YG
1967 Sea-Dweller
1971 Explorer II
1972 Hacking Movement
1974 Sapphire Crystal
1976 Oysterquartz
1977 Oysterquartz Day-Date
1977 Quick Set Date Feature
1978 Sea-Dweller 4000
1979 Submariner 300m/1000ft with Sapphire Crystal
1983 GMT-Master II
1983 Submariner Rolesor (aka Sub TT)
1988 Cosmograph Daytona (Zenith Movement aka Cal. 4030)
1992 Yachtmaster
1994 Yachtmaster Lady & Mid-Sized aka Boys Size
2000 Cosmograph Daytona with new in-house Mvt (Cal. 4130)
2001 Laser Etched Hologram In Crystal
2003 "Green" Submariner Date (aka Anniversary Model with Maxi Dial)
2002 end of Y series early 2003. Non lugs holes started to make there appearence on most models.
2004 Serial Number On The Inner Bezel
2004 New Datejust Case
2005 New GMT-Master YG (Cal. 3186)
2006 New GMT-Master Rolesor (Cal. 3186)
Hola: Excelente el artículo. De paso te voy a ahacer una consulta. Cada cuanto hay que hacerle el service l rolex?. Los manuales te dicen mucho mayor período que lo que te dicen aca en Brela o Laffitte ( los representantes de Rolex, por si ya no te acordas...). En esos pagos, qué recomiendan?. Aca te dicen " mejor cada uno o dos años" ( aún cuando comparto lo de la revisación anual de la sumergibilidad). Me gustaría oir tu opinión. Un triple abrazo desde Uruguay
Dr. César Baroffio

eufrasia
13-Nov-2007, 15:47
si es sumergible todos los años la prueba de estanqueidad, y cada cinco años la revision general, eso me recomendaron a mi, al menos

tengo que decirte que yo soy usuario de rolex desde hace poco tiempo, los compañeros del foro que llevan años te podran contestar mejor

un abrazo


Hola: Excelente el artículo. De paso te voy a ahacer una consulta. Cada cuanto hay que hacerle el service l rolex?. Los manuales te dicen mucho mayor período que lo que te dicen aca en Brela o Laffitte ( los representantes de Rolex, por si ya no te acordas...). En esos pagos, qué recomiendan?. Aca te dicen " mejor cada uno o dos años" ( aún cuando comparto lo de la revisación anual de la sumergibilidad). Me gustaría oir tu opinión. Un triple abrazo desde Uruguay
Dr. César Baroffio

cadiz
13-Nov-2007, 16:07
impresionate fernando mil gracias por ese curro tio...

eufrasia
13-Nov-2007, 18:36
el merito mio es haberlo buscado, lo hizo todo spacedweller del foro americano de rolex


impresionate fernando mil gracias por ese curro tio...

Ramón
13-Nov-2007, 18:42
Muchas gracias:) .

J. Onale
13-Nov-2007, 18:56
No soy experto en relojes. Ya comenté en el foro que poseo un Datejust desde el año 1988, casi siempre puesto y no pasó ninguna revisión aún. En la relojería donde lo compré me dicen que cuando lo crea conveniente, que cuando crea tener algún problema, pero que no me dan fechas. Van ya 19 años, y sin pningúan problema. He oído hablar que el aceite se degrada, que la estanqueidad de las gomas se anula, etc.Y lo he utilizado en natación, padel,... casi a diario. Ahora compré el GMT cerámico.
En ambos casos estoy sumamente contento.

eufrasia
02-Dec-2007, 20:07
Is this Rolex on eBay fake?
Proceed with caution on all Rolex auctions on eBay. Positive feedbacks on other Rolex sales are a good sign. Ask lots of questions of the seller. Remember that photos in the auction might not be of the actual watch. Caveat Emptor. Many people post the auction on the forum and ask for opinions on the auction, and many of the regular members enjoy this sport.

How can I tell my Rolex is real?
Members of the forum are familiar with Rolexes and can generally identify a fake Rolex from good, detailed photos--so post some and ask for opinions. Of course, this appraisal is worth what you paid for it--nothing. The only sure-fire way is to take it to a Rolex service center and have them examine it and give you an appraisal. Next, taking it to a Rolex authorized dealer and have them give it the once over. If they remove the caseback and examine the movement they will be able to tell at a glance if it is a genuine Rolex movement (no other movements are laid out in the same way). From a casual external examination, some expensive fakes may fool some of the people some of the time. Most Chinatown fakes fool nobody. If you're buying a Rolex and you want zero risk, buy it new from an authorized Rolex dealer. Anything else has some degree of risk. And, as James Dowling says, "buy the seller, not the watch"

Any question with the word "Hologram"
You can remove it or leave it on. Removing it may or may not decrease its resale value. Leaving it on may or may not cause pitting on the caseback. There is no right answer about the hologram, and no particular course of action seems to have major consequences. Do as you wish. See the full answer under Hologram.

Where are the model and serial numbers engraved?
The Model number is engraved between the lugs at 12 o'clock. You must remove the bracelet to see it.
The serial number is engraved between the lugs at 6 o'clock. You must remove the bracelet to see it.
The numbers printed on bracelets and end links are part numbers, not serial numbers.

Are Rolex movements bad like Walt Odets says?
Walt Odets did a review of the Explorer in the TimeZone's Horologium. It was not flattering. In a nutshell, Mr. Odets review says the Rolex Explorer is a solid watch that turns in surprisingly good performance considering the poor quality and finishing of the movement. There has been much debate on TimeZone over this article. Many of the flaws he points out in his review do not appear in other Rolex movements and, as the article itself says, the movement he tested kept time exceptionally well. This FAQ recommends that if you read the article also look at Jocke's amazing photos of his movements (and others) and try to find the same flaws. Also, feel free to read the many responses in TZ's archives. Posting this FAQ to either the Rolex or Public forums usually does not yield helpful responses. In short, don't let it get your blood pressure up.

Submariner vs. Seamaster
Only you can truly decide between the watches. They are both very good. See the full FAQ under Comparisons.
What Rolex did I see in that movie or TV show?
Here are some pages that list movie watch spottings:
http://members.optushome.com.au/heliosz/movielist.html
http://members.optushome.com.au/heliosz/rolexmovies.html
http://www.secondtimeround.com/Watches%20in%20the%20movies.htm
http://members.cox.net/d.yamasaki/celebritywatches/celebritywatches.htm
(thanks Hannes and AG, and akira)

Several specific questions come up frequently on the Rolex forum:
James Bond
Sean Connery wore a Rolex Submariner 5508 on a black and grey NATO strap, now refered to as the James Bond Submariner. In Live And Let Die Bond was issued a 5513 that could magnetically deflect bullets (or unzip dresses), and had a motorized bezel/saw. As of 2003, Omega places the Seamaster in James Bond movies and has released a special edition 007 watch.
James Dowling has more information about the Rolex/James Bond connection at http://www.ukwatches.com/Notes/Bond.html
"24", the TV show, first season.
Jack Bauer, the character played by Kiefer Sutherland, wears a Submariner. The watch is a fake (or, in this case, a "prop")--it has the wrong bezel, weak Cyclops magnification, wrong date font, and other problems.

What should I buy?
This FAQ has no opinion. The consensus on the forum is that you buy either 1) the watch that "smiles" at you when you put it on, or 2) the exact watch that the poster wears.

Are Rolex bracelets bad?
Rolex pioneered metal bracelets on gentleman's watches and their style has changed little since the mid-twentieth century. Some changes include shifting from hollow riveted metal bracelets to solid bracelets, and introduction of the Jubilee style, and the recent introduction of the solid end-links (SEL). The common criticism is that other watches have moved to more modern deployant style clasps with hidden mechanisms and use forged or machined parts rather than the stamped parts used in Rolex closures. The Rolex clasp is quite strong--certainly as strong as most other clasp mechanisms. One advantage of the Rolex clasp over hidden deployant closures is that it is easily adjusted and in smaller increments--most deployant closures can only be sized by inserting or removing entire links, whereas a Rolex clasp can be adjusted by moving the inside link in or out through the holes. The maintainer of this FAQ finds the Rolex bracelets quite lovely and comfortable.
My Rolex rattles!
It's probably the bracelet. Try removing the bracelet and see if it still rattles. Non-SEL bracelets are notorious for rattling. Some members of the Rolex forum have bent the "wings" on the bottom of the end-link up a bit to reduce the gap between the end-link and the watch head.

What is SEL?
Solid End-Links (SEL) are the end-links of the bracelet where it meets up with the watch head. Before the late 1990s, they were folded metal with small wings on the underside to keep them lined up. The SEL ones are a solid hunk of machined metal. It should be obvious from this description which is which in person.

How often should I service my Rolex?
Two schools of thought: Rolex and many WISes recommend every five years for a modern one or more frequently for a vintage one--proper service keeps it running smoothly and dry, grimy watch can wear and damage parts making for a more expensive repair.
On the other hand, a minority of WISers say that periodic maintenance service is not required. Just fix it when it breaks. They refer to their thirty-year old watches that are within COSC specs.
See the response under Service.

Will US customs seize my Rolex?
Here is what the US Customs Service says as of Jan 2003:
The Rolex trademark recordation with Customs indicates "Import of Goods Bearing Genuine Trademarks or Trade Names Restricted." This means that genuine Rolex products can only be imported with the permission of the trademark owner, Rolex Watch U.S.A. Inc. A private individual can hand carry one Rolex watch from a trip overseas without obtaining permission. Bring in more than one, and they will all be seized as a trademark violation. Purchasing a Rolex from overseas by mail is also a trademark violation.
Search http://www.customs.gov/ for more information.
(Answered by Alan J. Gow)

What are Tudor watches? What about the California Dials?
Tudor is a brand owned by Rolex. They use Rolex cases but not Rolex movements. See the section about Tudors.
What does T Swiss Made T mean? What does Swiss Made T-25 mean? What is Tritium?
The "T" means that the watch uses tritium as a luminous material. Tritium is mildly radioactive and will cause the luminous material to constantly glow for many years. Tritium's half-life is 12.5 years. The radioactivity is not harmful if the watch is not damaged, and even then only extensive exposure is risky (such as the people that painted the dials, and watchmakers). The "T" is marked on the dial as tritium is restricted in some closed environments (such as submarines). T Swiss Made T is the oldest tritium markings on the dial. Rolex reduced the amount of radioactive material to below 25 millicuries, and those watches are marked Swiss Made T-25 (put a less-than symbol instead of the dash--timezone can't handle the less-than symbol). Watches marked Swiss Made use Luminova--which is not radioactive--must be recharged by a bright light and will glow for several hours. During the transition from tritium to Luminova Rolex used dials marked T-25 and simply applied Luminova.
What is the age of my watch (based on serial numbers)?
The full answer is listed below.

Is this watch too big/small for me?
This FAQ has no opinion on any particular watch. However, current fashion dictates that a mans sports watch should be around 40mm, like the Submariner, and a gents dress watch should be around 35-38mm, like a DateJust. Women's watch fashion has greater variability in styles.
Why are Rolexes so expensive?
Short answer: Rolex sells every watch they make. There is no reason to reduce the price if that's what the market will bear. Nobody was ever forced to buy a Rolex, so if you want one, buy one, if you don't, don't. The implicit question here is are they a good value in comparison to other fine watches, and this FAQ will not enter the debate of brand, horological refinement, and so forth.

Why are the Stainless Steel (SS) Daytonas so expensive?
The SS Daytonas are extremely popular as of early 2003. Dealers frequently have wait lists, premiums over list price, or both. The stainless steel is selling for more than the two-tone (TT) stainless & gold model. This FAQ will not speculate as to why they are so popular.

Why is the Rolex website so vague? Why isn't my watch on the Rolex website?
There are two possible reasons cited in the forum. One is that they want to encourage buyers to go to a dealer and hold a real one in their hands, so they are deliberately skimpy on details. The other is that Rolex sells every watch they make, so why bother improving the website. Rolex is, of course, found at http://www.rolex.com/
(question proposed & answered by Dave Marskell)

What is the difference between the DateJust and the Date?
Size. The DateJust is 36mm, and the Date 34mm, not including crown. The Date only comes with the Oyster bracelet, whereas the DateJust can have either the Oyster or Jubilee bracelet. The DateJust is more expensive. They both use the same movements.

Accoutrements
The Hologram
What is it? What does it look like?
The hologram is a circular, anti-counterfeiting sticker applied to the case back that is designed to indicate at a glance that a watch is a new, genuine Rolex watch. It has the word Rolex printed vertically and horizontally crossword-style with the cornet in the center. It is a hologram, so it shimmers under point-source lights and has a three-dimensional look. Printed over the design just below center is the model number of the watch. Stuck over the hologram is a clear plastic sticker with a red line drawing a chord through it. This red line wears off quickly if the watch is worn and is designed to protect the hologram and indicate that the watch has been worn more than a few times. Before Rolex used holograms, green round stickers with the model number were used.
 
If anyone would wish to contribute when the switch to the hologram from the sticker occurred, this FAQ would be grateful.

Should I peel it off?
There are two schools of thought. There is, of course, no right answer. If you want to peel it off, do so. If not, don't. Either way it's fine.
Yes
It's there as a proof that the watch is genuine, and--now that you know that--you don't need it anymore. It serves no functional purpose. It can trap moisture behind it that can cause pitting in the caseback.
No
It enhances the resale value by some amount. It will melt away over time.

How do I remove the hologram?
You can just peel it off and spend a while wiping away the grimy stuff. The hologram will come apart, leaving some gunk on the caseback. This is to ensure that the hologram cannot be reused. Some have reported that if you're careful and use a knife blade to ease it off you can remove the Hologram intact.

What should I do with my hologram, now that I've removed it?
Stick it on a piece of paper and keep it with your guarantee. Throw it out. Keep it in your wallet with the photos of your kids. Of course, you can do whatever you wish with it. Having it may or may not have an impact on the future collectiblity of the watch--I don't know.

Does the hologram affect the resale value of the watch?
Yes
If the watch is NIB (New In Box) or NM (Near Mint) then having the hologram on the back does seem to improve the resale value. This matters for people that are either investing in the watch for the long run, or are planning on flipping the watch in a short time. As evidence, one forum member sold his carefully removed hologram on eBay for $100, one could argue, it increases the value by at least $100 (as of early 2003).
No

If you're planning on keeping the watch and handing it down to your kids, resale value doesn't matter, now does it? Or, if you're planning on wearing the watch, just get over yourself and wear it. You don't leave the plastic on the seats when you buy a new car, do you?
What comes with a new Rolex?
Oysters

* Outer cardboard box
* Inner box
* Pillow or clip that holds the watch
* COSC hang-tag
* Swimpruf hang tag
* Warranty/COSC Certification
* Owners Manual
* Oyster Manual

Submariners additionally have

* Anchor

Sea-Dwellers additionally have

* Anchor
* Bracelet Tool

What's the anchor for?
Nothing.

What is the Sea-Dweller bracelet tool for? Why does only the Sea-Dweller have one?
The tool is used to add or remove the extra, longer, diver's extension link that comes with that particular model of watch. The extra links are included to fit the watch over a wetsuit. The tool has two tools on it and an extra carbon fiber (aka fibre) pin of the diver's extension links.

What is the polishing cloth for?
Most Rolex WIS don't use the polishing cloth.

Where can I buy these things?
Post a WTB on SalesCorner, eBay, or search the internet. The accessories are all relatively common, but expensive in comparison to general watch tools.

What do the warranty papers look like? Is there a new style?
There is a new-style warranty paper with diamond patters on a background.
Cosmetic Issues
The cornet on my crown doesn't line-up.
Relax. That is normal. Do not try to force it.

Ohmygod! I scratched the case! Can I buff it out?
Yes, but don't
Many people recommend waiting until you have the watch serviced. When the watch is serviced by either Rolex or a competent watchmaker, they will polish the case and bracelet and it will come back looking like new. I mean, just like new.
Yes.
Jocke has an excellent tutorial in the Classics on how to polish a stainless steel Rolex. Of course, do at your own risk.
No.
If you have a gold-clad case, it may be ill advised. It could wear through the cladding.
How do I polish my case?
See Jocke's fantastic photo tutorial on TimeZone Classics. He also has a cool tutorial for putting a mirror finish on an Oyster bracelet's center links.

How can I polish scratches out of my acrylic crystal?
PolyWatch is a compound specifically designed for removing scratches from acrylic watches. Others have used Brasso. I've used it on my acrylic Air-King and it's great. Of course, use at your own risk.
Should the caseback have anything engraved on it?
No. The exceptions are the Sea-Dweller, some ladies models, and most Tudor watches. Some, such as COMEX Submariners do, but if you're looking at a COMEX Sub, you probably don't need to read the FAQ.
Are there Rolexes with display-backs (aka "exhibition backs")? Can I have one made?
There are only two known Rolexes with exhibition backs. James Dowling owns one. If you see a Rolex with a display back, it is almost certainly a fake.
It is possible to have a watchmaker machine a display back for your Rolex, but the consensus in the forum is that it is a bad idea. The objections are that it would damage the water resistance, most WISes would believe it to be fake, and Rolex movements are not highly decorated and thus not that much to look at. That said, it's your watch, do what you will.

How should I clean my Rolex?
If you have an Oyster, you can wash it with water. Be sure the watch is water resistant before doing this (i.e. it has been serviced in a reasonable timeframe, the crown is screwed in, etc). Of course, do not do this if you have a Cellini or other non-water resistant watch. Also, avoid solvents and detergents as they may damage the gaskets over time.
What's with the laser-etched cornet that's on some crystals?

Rolex began etching a tiny cornet on sapphire crystals in 2002. It is at the 6 o'clock position and requires either a 10x loupe our really good eyes. It is another anti-counterfeiting measure. Not all watches have it, and they are (like all changes) introducing it across the line slowly. Cornets with the letter "S" in the bottom of it indicates that the crystal is a service replacement. The general consensus on the forum is that it is 1) cool and 2) not that important for collectibility or resale value.
Serial Numbers, Model Numbers, History, &tc.

My Serial Number is x,xxx,xxx, so how old is my watch?
Rolex does not release that information, however some inferences have been drawn. Here is a link to a reference webpage:
http://www.tcjj.com/f-rrg-serialnumbers.html

What is the relationship between Tudor and Rolex?
Brand:
Rolex owns Tudor and position it as a down-market brand from the main line. Traditionally Tudor made virtual clones of Rolex designs, from Subs, to Day-Dates (called the Tudor Date-Day), to the Oyster Prince DateJust. They had some unique models like the Mini-Sub and the Tiger Chronograph but they were exceptions. Recently, though, they've broken free of the Rolex styling traditions and are making their own distinctive watches. Tudors are not currently distributed in the US. Tiger Woods was a spokesperson for the brand in the late 1990s (hence the Tiger Chronograph).
Cases:
Tudors use Rolex Oyster cases. Tudor casebacks, unlike most Rolexes (the SeaDweller is the exception), are engraved with the Rolex name. Also, many Tudors have the Rolex coronet on the crown. Tudor uses 316L stainless steel instead of 904 like Rolex.
Movements:
Tudor watches do not use Rolex movements (at least, not for a long time). Tudor uses ETA movements.
Collectability:
Being part of the Rolex family they command a higher price than other brand similar ETA movement watches. Some Tudors were military issue and those particular watches are collected. The old Tudor rose logo is more collectable than the newer shield logo. The military-style hands are more collectable than the mercedes style hands.
Controversy:
The "California" dial "Rolex Tudors" are redials and have little value off of eBay. There never was a Tudor watch that had the Rolex name and coronet prominently displayed--these are redialed and appear to sell on eBay for roughly twice their non-redialed value. There is no real controversy over the Tudor Subs, except some concerns that some subs may have had their mercedes hands changed to military to pump up their value. At least one completely fake Tudor Sub has been seen, so be careful.

Can I date my Tudor watch by its serial number?
From Chris (Melbourne, Australia): "Apparently, Rolex did/has not kept records on Tudor serial numbers like their Rolex line. Only way to accurately date your piece is to remove back and check out internal date markings. Will show something like: I/78, II/88, III/79 or IV/71. The first roman numeral indicates quarter of year that the watch was made, the arabic numeral denotes year of manufacture. Best I can do......"
What do the punched numbers in front of the serial number on the certificate mean? (Non US watches)
They are the "national codes", indicating which country the watch was initially shipped to by Rolex Geneva.
010-Switzerland
100-Germany
110-France
120-Austria
130-Belgium
138-Netherlands
150-Spain
160-England
265-Sweden
283-Finland
400-Hong Kong
413-Korea
430-Singapore
440-Taiwan
700-Canada
720-Mexico
741-Bahamas
752-Jamaica
768-Panama
810-Australia
900-Japan
Maybe:
527-Middle East (?)
828-China (?)
(Suggested by James Dowling)
What are the red letters stamped on my certificate (US watches only)
They indicate the date the watch was shipped from Rolex USA to the dealer, using the simple code
R=1
O=2
L=3
E=4
X=5
W=6
A=7
T=8
C=9
H=0
(Suggested and answered by James Dowling)
Technical - Non-Movement

Is the acrylic crystal bad?
This is something of a moot question. If you want a vintage Rolex, it will have an acrylic crystal. If you want a new Rolex, it will have a sapphire crystal. That said, here are the arguments either way.
Yes

Some people think that the plastic, acrylic crystal is cheap. I know I did when I first got a vintage Rolex.
It will scratch. In about a year, the crystal will have some tiny scratches (and maybe some not so tiny, depending on how careful you are).
No

Many collectors prefer the warm look of the acrylic crystal. After owning my watch for a while, I've grown to like it.
As the acrylic crystal is domed, the case can be thinner and still not interfere with the hands.
Acrylic is much less likely to shatter than a sapphire crystal.
Scratches can be removed using a polish.

Is the sapphire crystal better?
Yes
It will not scratch. Sapphire is extremely hard.
It is modern. All new Rolexes have sapphire crystals.
No
It can shatter. This is an expensive repair, as the watch must be serviced to ensure that no sapphire bits are in the movement.
It is more prone to chipping than acrylic
It shows fingerprints better than the FBI.
It makes the watch thicker.

Can I swap out the Acrylic crystal for a Sapphire one?
No. The cases are different. It might be possible to get an aftermarket Sapphire that will fit, but it will damage the water resistance of the watch, and Rolex will no longer service the watch. A common suggestion is that if you have a watch with an acrylic crystal and want a sapphire one instead, trade it.
What type of Stainless Steel does Rolex use?

Most watch manufacturers use stainless steel 1.4435 or 316L. Rolex uses stainless steel 1.4439 or 904L which is slightly different from 1.4435. Steel 904L and 316L have the same grade of hardness. The level of nickel discharge with 904L is slightly higher, causing an increased chance of allergic reaction when worn by people sensitive to nickel. While technically 904L is more corrosion resistant, this is typically a concern is in industrial applications using steel in equipment for handling chlorides, sulfur dioxide gas or other toxic materials. Almost no watch manufacturers except Rolex consider it worth using the 904L steel, especially given that the price for 904L is approximately three times that of 316L. (answer by Ayjay)

What are the different types of bracelets and clasps, such as Jubilee, Oyster, Oysterlock, Oyster Fliplock, and President?
Oyster:
A basic deployant clasp that clips into place with some pressure.
OysterLock:
Same as the Oyster above, but with another brace that clips over the clasp to provide more security. To release it, you need to flip the brace to the left and then flip open the rest of the clasp to the right.
FlipLock:
Same as the OysterLock but with the addition of the diver's extension. The Fliplock may also be longer in order to hold the extension.
President
The "President" bracelet is named the honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower who wore one of the first of that bracelet in 1956 when it was introduced. Rolex had given DDE (Winston Churchill as well) an 18K DateJust in 1946 to celebrate winning WWII and when it was returned for an overhaul in '56 the new bracelet was fitted and that's why the bracelet is called the President. The Day-Date is frequently referred to as the "President", but technically the name refers to the bracelet. Ike's watch was actually a DateJust! (excerpted from a post by Richard Carver)
(suggested by Stala, answered with help by JTG)

How do I open the diver's extension in the Oyster bracelet?
The divers extension is on the Oyster Fliplock bracelet. It is an extra folded link that can be deployed to increase the size of the bracelet to fit over a wetsuit. The Submariner and Sea-Dweller come with the Oyster Fliplock bracelet. If you can't figure it out, visit your local Rolex dealer for help.
On the SEL bracelet
There is a small O-shaped button on the link near the clasp. Press it and that will release the extension. It may be stiff and require some "work". Do at your own caution.
On the non-SEL bracelet
Pull the bracelet upwards, away from clasp until it's released. It will require some force the first few times, but tends to become easier when you've done it a couple of times. (Thanks AG)

What is the Gas (or Helium) Escape Valve on the Sea-Dweller for?
Note: I am not a diver, so I don't know anything about this. In saturation diving divers are kept at extreme pressure for extended periods of time. This allows the divers to spend more time working at great depths without having to go through decompression between dives. The high pressure gas (frequently mixed with Helium) will naturally seep into the watch as the crown is unscrewed and due to the small size of helium molecules. When decompressing, the high pressure inside a watch can cause its crystal to pop off, as the watch was designed to take external pressure, not internal pressure. The Sea-Dweller has a spring-loaded valve on the side of the case that will automatically open if internal pressure is considerably higher than external pressure. The Omega Seamaster also has a helium escape valve that is at its 10 o'clock position but it is manually unscrewed.

What are the different types of crown, such as Twinlock, Triplock, Oyster Lock?
Answer coming soon!
(suggested by earnbeau)
What are Rolesor and Rolesium?
These are the names Rolex uses for their two-tone (TT) models. Rolesor is 18kt gold and stainless steel (SS), and Rolesium is platinum and stainless steel. They do this due to some law in the UK I think that says they can't use the word Gold unless it is all gold and not gold and stainless steel. All modern Rolexes that are TT, all gold, or all platinum are solid and never plated.
Technical - Movement
What does "Perpetual" mean?
"Perpetual" is Rolex's way of saying the watch is automatic or self-winding. Perpetual watches have a rotor in the back that rotates as you move your hand, and that rotor is geared down and winds the mainspring. See should I wind my watch for more info.

What are the different movements used in Rolex watches?
Hannes has a list of movements and the watches they were found in on his website, http://www.oysterworld.de/ .

The second hand ticking isn't smooth. It looks like it does about five a second. Is it fake?
No. The rule-of-thumb that Rolexes have smooth second hands means that it doesn't tick once a second like a quartz movement. A Rolex actually ticks 5 or 7 times a second, depending on the movement.
Also, the OysterQuartz ticks once a second, as it uses a quartz movement. Also, the rare Rolex Tru-Beat from the early 1960s had a mechanical movement that ticked once a second.

My watch is running X seconds fast/slow per day. Is this bad?
COSC certification is for an accuracy of -4 to +6 seconds per day. That is very good accuracy for a mechanical watch. If it is considerably outside of that, consider having the watch serviced. Some Rolexes are spot on.
Does a new Rolex speed up or slow down as it breaks in?
Yes. A new watch will vary slightly as the parts wear to mesh better, and oil becomes distributed differently. I do not know if it speeds up or slows down in general. If you do know, send me an e-mail.

My watch is a bit fast/slow per day. What can I do?
You have two options.
Different overnight positions affect accuracy
If you leave your watch dial up, that will typically cause your watch to gain a second or a couple overnight. 12 o'clock down will cause it to loose a second or so overnight. This is just based on observations. My particular watch seems to be well regulated in all positions and always gains ~3 seconds per day regardless of position.
Have your watch regulated
Rolex or a Rolex knowledgeable watchmaker can adjust a Rolex using a combination of a timing machine and information you supply about how fast or slow the watch runs. Rolexes have adjustable mass balances--they have small weights that are either screws on the outside or nuts (Microstella) on the inside that can be adjusted to move the mass of the balance in or out to adjust the speed of oscillation. This is considered superior to the regulators used on other watches as it does not introduce beat errors (i.e. when the tick is longer that the tock).
My watch is running several minutes fast/slow per day. Is this bad?
It could be good news or bad news.

Good news:
The watch could have become magnetized. This causes the hairspring to magnetically cling to itself, so it acts like it's considerably shorter. This makes the watch run very fast. This can be fixed quickly and cheaply by any competent watchmaker without opening the case.

Bad news:
The watch needs service. It could be something relatively simple like the hairspring has become tangled up--I've heard of this happening to mechanical watches while clapping. Or it could be that the oil has dried up and the movement needs a cleaning and service. Or something worse. Get it serviced.

Should I wind my watch? How do I wind my watch?
If you wear your perpetual (automatic) watch, the motion of the rotor will keep it wound. If the watch is rundown you should wind it before wearing.
To wind your watch, unscrew the crown and advance the crown clockwise to wind. About 40 twists should wind the watch fully. If you have a perpetual watch, you can not over wind the watch. When it is fully wound, the mainspring will slip inside the barrel as it does when the watch is being wound by wrist action. It is likely you will not be able to tell the watch is fully wound.
Twisting the crown counterclockwise will not wind the watch but neither will it damage the movement.
There is some discussion about whether winding a watch frequently will prematurely wear the crown and tube and there are two differing opinions. Some say that the watch is designed to be unscrewed and wound every day and that it will certainly last the five year service interval. Others say that it will wear prematurely. While the author of the FAQ used to espouse a particular opinion, he has changed his mind half-way and now has no advice on the subject.

How long is the power reserve?
Around 44 hours. The Daytona has a power reserve of around 56 hours.
How do I pull out the crown to wind or set the watch?
Rolex Oyster crowns screw onto a tube for water resistance. Unscrew the crown counter clockwise until it comes free of the threads and then pull it out. Don't feel stupid--this is actually a common question.

The date switches over 5 ½ minutes after midnight. Is this a problem?
No. If it is more than an hour off of midnight, have Rolex or any other competent watchmaker adjust it for you. If you post this question on the forum, members will point out that if you're staring at your watch in the middle of the night to see when the date flips over, you have a problem.

What is COSC certification? What Rolexes have it?
Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronometers (COSC) is the Swiss center that tests watch movements. The chronometer specifications are -4 to +6 seconds per day under a variety of temperatures and positions (orientations) for large mechanical wristwatches. COSC also has a test for quartz movements, but it is stricter and less common. In 2001 Rolex certified 761,601 movements (gents and ladies), 573 were OysterQuartz. The movements are tested partially assembled (auto mechanisms, date mechanisms and the like are not installed) and before the movement is installed in the case. After final assembly, Rolex retests the watch. For more information (and to find out what the most accurate movement probably is (hint: it's a Rolex, but not what you'd guess)) read WatchBore's Inside COSC article.
Information on what models are and are not certified is coming soon.

Should I use a winder?
A winder is a watch holder with a motor that rotates the watch so as to keep an automatic watch fully wound. WISes with large collections frequently use winders to keep some watches that they occasionally wear wound, running, and set. This is helpful for watches with many complications like perpetual calendars, moon phases and the like, as resetting them for occasional wear is difficult. Rolexes typically do not have as many complications. The pros are that it keeps the watch running and the oils distributed. The cons are that it causes wear on the movement.

How should I store a watch I'm not going to wear?
It is generally recommended that you wind your watch every few months to keep the oils distributed. It is generally recommended that you have the watch serviced after an extended idle period of several years.

What is shock protection? What is KIF?
"Shock protection" means that the balance staff jewels are held in settings with springs that allow them to give under force. Without this "give", the balance staff or jewels could be damaged easily by jars or bumps.
This website has an animation of how Incabloc-brand shock protection works: http://www.clock-watch.de/index.html?html/tec/sto/inc.htm
KIF Parechoc SA ( http://www.kif-parechoc.ch/ ) is the brand used by Rolex.
What is a "Sweep Second Hand"?
A sweep second hand is one that is mounted in the center of the dial and sweeps over the entire face. This is in contrast to a "seconds sub-dial" that is typically at 6 o'clock (AKA "6-eater"). A sweep second hand can be on a quartz or mechanical movement--it does not say anything about whether it ticks once a second or more smoothly. Okay, this isn't a FAQ but rather the maintainer's pet peeve but many newbies misuse the term. Don't believe me? Look it up in the dictionary.

Can I (blank) with my Rolex?
The Oyster Rolex is a rugged watch (Cellini dress watches are not designed to be as tough). It is able to handle normal, extreme activity. Of course, use your own discretion--I am not responsible if you do something this FAQ says you can, and it harms the watch. Do anything at your own risk. People who had their Rolexes in safety deposit boxes in the World Trade Centers in NYC will attest to the fact that nothing is 100% safe. If you have any questions about what your watch can handle, I recommend calling your local Rolex service center and asking them.

Can I wear my Submariner or Sea-Dweller diving?
Yes. That is what they were designed for. Of course, do not exceed the depth rating. If the watch has not been serviced recently, having it pressure tested is a good idea as the seals only good for around five years. Of course, do this (and anything else) at your own risk.

Can I wear it in the hot tub?
Yes
A call I placed to the Rolex service center said it's no problem. Many forum members (who all appear to have much more fun than I do) say they do it all the time with no problem. If the watch was designed to take hundreds of meters of pressure it should be able to handle a few feet of bubbly warm water. Some say that a hot tub alone is not a problem, but don't jump straight into a cold pool.
No
The seals were not designed for water that hot. And, especially do not jump straight from the hot-tub into a cold pool, as thermal expansion problems that may damage the seals.

Can I wear it on my Harley?
Yes. The movement is rugged. One forum member fell off his motorcycle and his Sea-Dweller looked several millimeters thinner by the time he stopped. Fortunately he was fine. The watch, while scratched beyond recognition, still ran but would need a new case, bezel, and bracelet.

Can I wear it in the shower?
Provided your Rolex is designed to be water resistant, has been pressure tested, and the crown is screwed in, there is no problem wearing it in the shower. Some forum members recommend it as it keeps the watch clean. Others discourage it as the soap causes the watch and bracelet to become scummy. The FAQ maintainer does not wear his watch in the shower (the showers are usually short enough that I don't need to know the time while I'm in there).

Can I wear my Rolex while golfing?
Yes. The maintainer of this FAQ presumed that a Rolex was required while golfing.

Service
How often should I service my watch?
The recommended schedule is every five (5) years. Some people only have service done when the watch acts up. Some say they have gone 20 years without service. This is in general not recommended as it could increase the cost of a repair bill; instead of a cleaning, oiling, and adjustment it could also involve replacing worn parts.

Should I send it to Rolex or have my watchmaker work on it?
If the watch is under warranty it should be sent to Rolex for repair. You can either send it through an authorized dealer or directly to Rolex. One of the advantages of owning a Rolex is their world-wide, high-quality service organization. Check the website and call the service center for instructions before shipping. The advantages of the official Rolex service centers are that they have access to original parts and can restore a watch to like-new condition. Also, Rolex will not work on watches that have after-market parts installed. I believe they will remove these parts and replace them with original Rolex parts and charge you for the parts and labor. So, by using Rolex service centers you ensure that they will service your watch in the future. The down side to the official service centers are that they are more expensive than private watchmakers, have longer waits (months, instead of weeks), and may not wish to work on older vintage models (for example, they will not clean up a vintage dial, but replace with either old-stock or a new dial that fits--bad for the red Sub owner).

Where are the Service Centers?
Surf over to http://www.rolex.com/hq/fich_service.html and the list is there.
What's the story with the US Rolex Service Centers?
While the majority of comments about Rolex service are positive (a common observation is that the watch came back looking just like new) some forum members have had poor experiences with some of the Rolex service centers. Rolex NYC seems to have gotten more negative feedback than either Dallas or Beverly Hills, but the frequency of complaints is so slow that the maintainer of the FAQ thinks it may not be statistically significant. Also, Rolex does appear make good faith efforts to rectify all service problems.

Can my independent watchmaker get Rolex parts?
United States of America
Usually no. Rolex tightly controls distribution of their parts. Some watchmakers are still able to order from Rolex, but it is uncommon. Aftermarket Rolex replacement parts are widely available. However, Rolex will not service a watch with aftermarket parts (or they will replace them with Rolex parts and charge you for the new parts).
Outside the USA
Yes.

Can I keep my old parts during a Rolex service?
No. At least in the US, all parts are on an exchange basis only. If you want a new dial, you have to turn in your old one.

What is a re-dial? Should I have it done?
A Redial is when an old dial is stripped of applied markers and paint, cleaned, and has new paint and text printed on. If your old dial is damaged (by water, for example) a redial can restore it. Redials frequently can be spotted by experts as the printing isn't exactly it came from Rolex. If your dial is aged, but not new looking, it is recommended that you do not get a redial, as it will reduce the value of a vintage watch--all original but aged is preferred by collectors to new-looking but redone. Of course, if you are not planning on reselling the watch and want a new looking dial, a redial may be for you. General advice is not to skimp--a cheap redial can look terrible.
You can also have Rolex swap out your old dial and/or hands for new ones. This will make your watch look, of course, like new. For vintage collectors, this can be bad. Note: they will usually keep the old ones.

What is a re-lume?
If a watch has tritium luminous markers, they will stop glowing after several years (see the FAQ on Tritium). Some watchmakers will remove the old tritium and replace it with Luminova (or other luminous material). As with re-dials, cheap re-lumes can look terrible (one picture posted on TZ looked like it had toothpaste squeezed on it.

Collectability
Are Rolexes good investments?
No. The stock market, bonds, and other traditional investments usually do much better than watches. However, unlike stocks, you can wear your Rolex when you go windsurfing. Of course, this FAQ should not be taken as a source of financial advice.

Why do Rolexes retain their value better than other watches?
There are seem to be two common, speculative reasons. Firstly the brand is widely recognized and coveted--this creates a large market for used watches. Secondly Rolex changes the design of watches so slowly and gradually that older model watches are not "out of fashion".

What is a Red Submariner?
Rolex briefly printed the word Submariner in red on dials. Aside from the printing, there is nothing different about these watches, but as they are rare, they are collectible. There is also a Red Sea-Dweller. For more information, see http://www.redwatches.com/ has more information.

What is a COMEX Submariner?
COMEX is a diving company. They had customized Rolex Submariners and Sea-Dwellers made for them with their logo on the front and engraving on the back. They are rare and quite collectible.

What is a Milgauss?
The Milgauss was designed to withstand high magnetic fields. Mechanical watches can become magnetized, affecting their operation (see "my watch is running fast"). It was not popular and few were made. It's rarity makes it quite collectible, although there is controversy over the actual value of these watches.

Comparisons
Rolex vs. Omega?
The most common comparison is between the Rolex Submariner and the Omega Seamaster. They are both good watches. Buy whichever one you like.

Rolex vs. Invicta?
The reason this comparison comes up so often is that Invicta makes watches that are based directly on Rolex designs. At a glance, they are similar. However, Invicta, unlike a fake, is branded under their own name and use their own movements. They are very cheap. The general consensus on the forum is that if someone is considering buying a fake Rolex for the look, they should buy an honest, cheap Invicta instead.

Rolex vs. Fake?
There are many fakes out there, some that are barely operational as watches, others with Swiss ETA movements in well-made cases (that cost almost as much as a Rolex). Stay away from them all.
The vast majority of fakes can easily be spotted by a member of the Rolex forum either due to poor quality or differences from genuine watches. The only fool-proof way to be sure that a Rolex is not fake is to have a watchmaker examine the movement--the Rolex movement is laid out differently from all other movements and a bogus watch will be immediately apparent. There are no fakes that will fool a Rolex knowledgeable watchmaker. Many fakes come with boxes, papers, hang-tags, and the like. James Dowling cautions that you should "buy the seller, not the watch." If you don't trust the seller, walk away. If the deal is too good to be true, it probably is.

JABAPESE
10-Apr-2008, 13:25
Hola , veo que eres un gran entendido, si puedes sacame de dudas,el 16610lv(verde),¿se ha dejado de hacer? ninguna joyeria lo tiene,¿ los primeros daytona zenith4030 ref16523 año 1990,con dos nueves en la esfera se cotizan mas? ¿los tudor submariner con fechador ref79090 son piezas de coleccion dificiles de conseguir? muchas gracias

eufrasia
10-Apr-2008, 13:29
errrrrrrrrr ::Dbt:: ::Dbt:: ::Dbt:: veras...en fin...este post es como un gran interrogante en el que plantear preguntas como esas que dices...y otras, no soy ningun entendido, soy un curioso :-P :-P :-P


Hola , veo que eres un gran entendido, si puedes sacame de dudas,el 16610lv(verde),¿se ha dejado de hacer? ninguna joyeria lo tiene,¿ los primeros daytona zenith4030 ref16523 año 1990,con dos nueves en la esfera se cotizan mas? ¿los tudor submariner con fechador ref79090 son piezas de coleccion dificiles de conseguir? muchas gracias